Questions tagged [laws-of-physics]

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What is a "fundamental law of nature"? [duplicate]

The trigger for this question is from "University Physics with Modern Physics" (by Young & Freedman) when they mentioned that Ohm's law is not actually a law; this sentiment was echoed ...
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35 views

If Lorentz invariance and the quantum-mechanical unitarity of time evolution would be emergent, wouldn't that mean that all physics is emergent?

I have read that Lorentz invariance and the quantum-mechanical unitarity of time evolution are the foundation of all modern physics. So, if somehow these were not fundamental characteristics of nature ...
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48 views

How necessary are the laws of physics given the impossibility of violating the law of conservation?

The Damascene theologian Ibn Taymiyya believed that God originates things ex materia, not ex nihilo or without prior material conditions, arguing that this latter type of creation entails a logical ...
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Do all physical processes necessarily imply a computation is taking place? [closed]

I would like to understand if any and all physical processes taking place, necessarily imply computations are also taking place. As a motivating scenario for the question, consider the following: ...
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107 views

About the tautology of physics quantities and laws [closed]

Physics quantities and laws, especially some fundamental laws and quantities, show property of tautology. For instance, mass and Newton's second law. My question is why physics quantities and laws ...
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3answers
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Why does the national center for science education say “gravity is only a theory”? [closed]

I had someone show me that when you search “gravity is fact” on google you’ll get the National Center for Science Education saying things like “gravity is only a theory” Can someone just read these ...
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Are Laws of nature independent of time? [duplicate]

There are certain laws that govern the universe and these laws make up the fundamentals of any physical observation. But were these laws present the way there are now since the beginning of space time,...
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3answers
102 views

How do we know that physical laws/postulates/principles/rules are true? [closed]

There are many principles in physics. Two examples are conservation of energy and Pauli exclusion principle. How do we know that such principles are true? What if there occur exceptional events that ...
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1answer
96 views

Equations and functions in physics and mathematics

In physics we can define velocity as the derivative of position. We can write: $$u = \frac{d}{dt}x(t)$$ or $$u = g(t)$$ where $g$ denotes the function after differentation of the position with respect ...
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Do Newton's laws of motion imply no physical difference between different inertial frames of reference?

I'm a mathematician learning physics from scratch, for my own curiosity and interest. Starting from the basics, I'm trying to get a deep grasp of Newton's laws of motion. V.I. Arnold describes Galileo'...
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1answer
139 views

Is below description of the difference between laws and principles of physics correct? [closed]

Could some one provide elaborated answer whether description of the difference between laws and principles of physics, which I found on the Internet (https://sciencing.com/difference-between-law-and-...
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1answer
122 views

What laws of physics suggest life and evolution will occur? [closed]

Do any laws of physics tell us why life and evolution occurs? From my understanding the laws of physics is about reduction/materialism and with that we can explain everything else. To that end, which ...
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Is there a foundation of mathematical logic? [duplicate]

As Mathematics has its foundations in logic and set theory in the sense that you can derive all of mathematics from such theories, does mathematical physics have such foundations? A theory or theories ...
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7answers
202 views

When Sean Carroll says "The Laws Underlying The Physics of Everyday Life Are Completely Understood" , is he being click-baity or is he correct? [closed]

I read three posts of his on his blog: The Laws Underlying The Physics of Everyday Life Are Completely Understood Seriously, The Laws Underlying The Physics of Everyday Life Really Are Completely ...
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Do the same laws of physics hold in two different locations that are infinitely far away from each other?

Another way of asking the question: Suppose there are two locations A and B, and the distance between A and B is infinite. Suppose there are two observers, one at each location, and finally assume ...
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2answers
466 views

Is concept expressed in "Autodidactic Universe" article plausible? [closed]

As I understood, the authors (Lee Smolin et al) of the "Autodidactic Universe" article suggest that the fundamental laws of nature as time progresses since the Big Bang event (which happened ...
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wondering light polarization, enjoying three dimensional cinema

I am very fascinated by physics, but I'm not much into it beacuse I studied it as an amateur many years ago. I'm trying to understand things about optics and polarization of light, and in particular ...
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708 views

How to know if the error is in a law or in uncertainty of the measurement?

I read these words in a (great) answer to this question: There are errors that come from measuring the quantities and errors that come from the inaccuracy of the laws themselves But how do we know ...
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Accuracy of physics laws

How accurate are physics laws? For example, for newtons' first law $F=ma$, if we can get a measurement of both force, mass and acceleration with a percentage of uncertainly close to $1\times 10^{-9}\%$...
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2answers
90 views

Is there a concept that refers to the fact that we understand systems, but we don't understand what's between those systems? [closed]

Is there a concept that refers to the fact that we understand systems, but we don't understand what's between those systems? By that I mean, we understand quantum mechanics, but if we keep asking the ...
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Is there any inflationary model or any string theory model that does not assume any symmetries as fundamental?

If I understand them right, in usual chaotic inflationary models or in string theory some symmetries are assumed as fundamental and therefore some fundamental laws of physics are assumed. But, in some ...
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1answer
64 views

Do we have any example of fundamental forces not working or having errors? [closed]

When we read about DNA, we see that the laws of chemistry and biochemistry and biology are rigid. But once in a while these laws fail to act (correct me if I'm wrong) and that is the source of what we ...
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What is the role of the laws of physics in a block universe?

Definition of a block universe - The idea that the whole universe exists simultaneously and time doesn’t flow. For those who favor this kind of theory (the few of you), what is the role of the laws of ...
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2answers
119 views

How do scientists derive equations and formulas? [closed]

How do scientists derive equations? For example, how do they know that: Work done = Force × Displacement And why is it always multiplication and not anything else? Why not addition?
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1answer
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Are circular waves on a lake just the borders of a “bubble”?

When you throw a rock on a lake it makes circular visible waves. Can it be that the rock causes a “expansive bubble” underwater that we can only see its borders on the surface? Like the bubble made of ...
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2answers
76 views

"Law without law" in inflation?

John Wheeler proposed that the fundamental laws of physics actually were emergent from a primordial random/chaotic underlying state. According to this view, every physical law is actually emergent. Is ...
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Could the laws of physics have existed before the universe? [closed]

Alexander Vilenkin writes that perhaps the laws of physics could have existed even before the universe emerged from nothing. How could the laws of physics exist without the existence of the universe ...
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492 views

How to understand the laws of physics correctly? [closed]

Are the laws of physics something that exists separately from the universe or is it a description of the physical properties of the universe and objects in it?
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Why are there two pressures acting on a body in opposite direction during free fall on earth?

This is how my sir explained this to me: There are more than billions of atoms present in the earth's atmosphere. All those atoms have their force acting downwards. When he explained this diagram to ...
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Are the different fields in multi-field inflation described by different Lagrangians?

The most simple models of cosmological inflation consider only one scalar field. However, there are more complex models (like hybrid inflation or multi-field inflation) which consider more than one ...
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Could some kind of vacuum decay modify the most fundamental laws of physics?

A false vacuum is a hypothetical vacuum that is not actively decaying, but somewhat yet not entirely stable ("metastable"). It may last for a very long time in that state, and might ...
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4answers
119 views

Do the laws of physics describe the properties of the universe? [closed]

What do the laws of physics describe? Do they describe the properties of the universe? Or does the properties of the universe described by physical theories, and laws describe how those theories work?
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How does the whole universe agree on the laws of physics? [duplicate]

How is it possible that the every particle in the universe agrees on the laws of physics? What enforces those laws? Might the laws change slightly across the universe in the same way the cosmic ...
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1answer
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What would it mean if symmetries are not fundamental at all?

In this paper 1 written by Joseph Polchinski, he seems to indicate that all symmetries of nature may not be fundamental: From more theoretical points of view, string theory appears to allow no exact ...
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General relativity (and other theories) when proven wrong

So, I have been watching some science videos regarding Einstein's theory on general relativity and until today the predictions based on his equations have been proven to stand. My question would be, ...
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2answers
140 views

Could the basic fundamental laws of physics change between universes in cosmological inflationary models?

According to cosmological inflationary models, different universes governed by different effective/low-energy laws of physics could exist, but the most fundamental laws of nature would remain the same....
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1answer
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When an object is on an inclined plane the perpendicular gravitational component is equal to the normal force. How can you conclude this?

When an object is on an inclined plane the force of gravity acts downwards on the object and the normal force is perpendicular to the surface of the inclined plane. When we normally solve these ...
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59 views

Forces acting on two blocks of different masses and their relations (Newton's Laws)

Could someone please help me with this question about Newton's laws and free body diagram? "A block of mass M = 8.00 kg is located on a horizontal surface without friction. A second block of mass ...
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1answer
29 views

Binnig's fractal evolution applied to multiple universes?

Gerd Binnig, Nobel laureate in physics in 1986, proposed in his article "The fractal structure of evolution" 1 that everything in the universe, including its laws, had changed and became ...
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4answers
284 views

Why does a physical theory need to be testable? [closed]

We are generally not interested in physical theories that cannot be tested with the scientific method. This would seemingly apply even if the theory has other advantages, e.g. simpler, more general, ...
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Doesn't the Ideal Gas Law contradict the First Law of Thermodynamics

Let's say that an ideal gas does work on a piston, thus increasing the volume of the gas in its insulated cylinder. The pressure of the gas is assumed to be constant; therefore, by the ideal gas law, $...
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Force exerted by hand

Kindly give me the explanation of this numerical which says A ball of mass $0.2$ kg is thrown vertically upwards by applying a force by hand. If the hand moves $0.2$ m while applying the force and the ...
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Why are so many physical laws expressed in terms of *integer* powers of some quantities? [duplicate]

Why are so many fundamental physical laws expressed in terms of integer powers of some quantities? I'd expect this to be a very, very unlikely occorrance, since the Nature doesn't know that "we ...
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Why are most physical laws dependent on small powers?

The equation with the highest exponent I could find was the coefficient of energy loss of light scattered in an optical fiber: $$ {\displaystyle \alpha _{\text{scat}}={\frac {8\pi ^{3}}{3\lambda ^{4}}}...
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Consistency in the laws of physics [duplicate]

When I read about past events in the universe (i.e. big bang, formation of the sun and planets, etc) future events (i.e. sun becoming a red giant) and distant objects (black holes, nebulas, galaxies, ...
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51 views

Why are squares, square-roots, and second-order differentials, common in natural laws, but not cubes, cube-roots, and higher order effects? [duplicate]

Natural laws often feature squares and square roots, and second-order differential equations. Cubic laws, cube-roots, and third-order differentials are fairly rare. (Some counter-examples: square-...
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A Newton's third law confusion

Suppose you have a bird inside of a glass cage with some amount of gas inside it. We now place this cage on a weighing scale and observe its readings in different situations. Case (1): when the bird ...
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2answers
87 views

Explain how scaling of the inverse square law breaks down at a stars surface

If the radiation pressure at distance $d>R$ from the center of an isotropic black body star is found to be $$P_{rad}=\large{\frac{4\sigma T^4}{3c}}\left[1-\left(1-\frac{R^2}{d^2}\right)^{\frac{3}{2}...
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1answer
191 views

Laws of Physics [closed]

Here is a thought. Let us assume the there is an infinite uni-directional line of balls. And it is being jumbled up again and again, randomly. (say by 'God'!) I in my limited experience/capacity can ...
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115 views

Is there any different model for universe which can create life?

We know, our universe has four forces (there can be more than four) and some laws. And laws, forces, and particles consequently give the universe the ability to produce living things. Can we create ...