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Questions tagged [laws-of-physics]

DO NOT USE THIS TAG just because the question deals with a law of physics!

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What happens If a uniform force is applied on angles on a sphere? [on hold]

What happens If a uniform, constant force is applied on angles on a sphere? Will it start spinning? If so then on which direction? Will it keep spinning considering the friction on all angles?
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1answer
24 views

A circuit out of a ring in amper law paradox [closed]

Assuming that there is three line of circuit and our amper ring is surrounded just two circuit . According to amper law the magnitude of B is just related to the circuits in the ring . But here the ...
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3answers
56 views

Why we don't use Ampere's law to find the magnetic field due to a wire of finite length at its perpendicular bisector?

I know that finite length doesn't have symmetry and thus its hard to apply maths here but take the case of magnetic field of a wire of finite length at a distance r from axis of the wire exactly at ...
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0answers
21 views

Arranging objects by mass [closed]

I have n objects with different masses . Say mass of n1=m1, n2=m2 .... so on. I want to use concept of centrality in physics to arrange these objects in a field (computer simulation ) . Where object ...
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1answer
62 views

Are there other theories (apart from string theory) that combined with inflation, would produce universes with different laws?

In chaotic inflation, space would stop expanding in some points, creating hubble volumes that could experience different spontaneous symmetry breaking, which would result in different properties, such ...
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0answers
18 views

Question reg. reasoning of deterministic reversible cyclical laws - The Theoretical Minimum

I recently started reading "The Theoretical Minimum: What you need to know to start doing Physics". In the first chapter, the authors define the "Minus-First law", and state that reversible ".. laws ...
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1answer
41 views

Difference between Postulate versus Law

In quantum mechanic, we have many different postulates. In classic mechanic, we have different laws. As long as I know that physics's laws are temporarily correct until an anomaly. But what is the ...
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0answers
41 views

What physical laws differs in non inertial frame

For me physical laws should be observers independent, what should be depend on the observers are measurements. But one of the postulates of Special relativity is that all laws of physics should be ...
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2answers
75 views

Examples of theories that assume the existence of an “External Reality”?

In this paper written by physicist Max Tegmark (https://arxiv.org/pdf/0704.0646.pdf) it talks about "External Reality Hypothesis". Specifically, he says: Although many physicists subscribe to the ...
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0answers
48 views

Is Universal Law of Gravitation a 'law'? [duplicate]

My textbook mentions that the universal law of gravitation cannot be proved. If so, then why is it called a 'law' and not a 'hypothesis'?
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2answers
50 views

Does the principle of explosion mean we can prove objects must “fall up” because QM is inconsistent with GR?

(Not sure if this is more appropriate to the Maths.SE) The Principle of Explosion is a law of classical logic which says that if we accept inconsistency, then everything becomes possible. I am ...
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1answer
51 views

Would any continuous model of the universe have/be based on hypercomputational laws?

I've read that when Turing-Church thesis is applied to the universe and physics, one of the three interpretations that we can use and is defended by some important physicists is that: "The universe ...
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3answers
188 views

Is physics the same everywhere in the universe, what if it isn't? [closed]

So, my friend the other day brought up an interesting topic, does physics need to be the same everywhere? He asked, how do we know the universe doesn't, say, simplify itself, far away from us? For ...
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3answers
2k views

Is the second law of thermodynamics a “no-go” theorem?

As defined here, there are several no-go theorems in theoretical physics. These theorems are statements of impossibility. The second law of thermodynamics may be stated in several ways, some of which ...
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1answer
140 views

Could false quantum vacuum decay change fundamental laws of physics? [closed]

It is often said that low energy/effective physical laws (i.e fundamental physical constants) could possibly change if a quantum false vacuum decays into a true (stable) level of quantum vacuum. But, ...
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4answers
137 views

Thermodynamics second law variational statement query

In thermodynamics as I understand entropy is a state function. A state function is a property whose value does not depend on the path taken to reach that specific value. In contrast, functions that ...
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1answer
48 views

Theories, Corollaries, and Models

I apologize if this question seems overly basic. I was wondering how to recognize what a theory is really saying, as opposed to the explanation/corollaries that are drawn from it. As an example, take ...
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1answer
70 views

Faraday's Law and the Law of Inertia

Faraday's Law can be stated qualitatively as : Any loop (of wire) opposes/resists the change of magnetic flux through it. The Law of Inertia states that any physical object resists its change in ...
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2answers
68 views

Issue regarding Newton's second law

Newton's second law says that : The rate of change of momentum of a body is directly proportional to the applied force and takes place in the direction in which the force acts. Mathematically it says,...
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3answers
112 views

What are the most fundamental laws of Newtonian Physics? [closed]

By fundamental, I mean, those laws which if assumed could be used to prove all other laws and provide the essence of the complete picture. I am a high school student, while learning physics I came ...
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1answer
113 views

If two different theories describe experimental observations equally well, can one be said to be more valid than the other? [closed]

Assuming both use accepted rules of logic, which of the two theories would be accepted and on what basis, for example: simplicity etc.
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5answers
62 views

Why are the laws of nature consistent? Is it possible for there to be an existence where (eg.) gravity works only some of the time?

Why does the universe always apply the precise forces/events/occurrences in such a way that it wont let you ever catch it in a paradox? What creates the consistency?
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1answer
133 views

Why do the laws of physics fail to predict the behavior of frustrators? [closed]

This is my attempt to make an earlier question less broad. This question takes the form of a thought experiment, and is based on this video. Suppose you are given: The positions, velocities, ...
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4answers
192 views

How are theories selected?

My motivations for asking this question are philosophical but I think this is a question that is best answered by the physics community. There is a problem in the philosophy of science called the '...
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2answers
76 views

What laws/assumptions are considered fundamental/axiomatic to the widest range of fields of physics?

Inspired by the PBS Space time video on Noether's Theorem released the other day, I got to thinking about what can be considered the most fundamental laws in Physics. They mention in the video that ...
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1answer
167 views

Can the fundamental laws of Physics be formalized as axioms written in First Order Logic (FOL), or any other logical system for that matter?

Is it possible to state any fundamental law in Physics as an axiom written in First Order Logic (FOL), or any other logical system (and semantic interpretation) for that matter? EDIT: in a way that ...
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1answer
68 views

Static temperature

A Professor of Fluid Mechanics a told that the static temperature is the temperature observed when the relative speed between observer(thermometer) and fluid is zero. I have trouble understanding as ...
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2answers
150 views

Do we study the true nature of the universe or reality or just create a model (mathematical) to get approximation close enough to our use? [closed]

Do we study the true nature of the universe or reality or just create a model(mathematical) to get approximation close enough to our use? whether they have to do any thing with reality or not. I have ...
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0answers
101 views

What physical laws would need to change? [closed]

My fictional worlds reside in a multiverse. More specifically, they reside in a universe within that multiverse that is very similar to ours. But here are some big differences: White holes are in ...
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1answer
18 views

An electricity experiment [closed]

Ohms law can be sated as V=IR. a. Suppose in an experiment, data is collected of the variation of current with resistance R. Next a plot of R vs I -1 is made. How does one determine the value of V ...
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1answer
203 views

Are certain fields of physics axiomatized?

Everything from Quantum mechanics can be derived from six (?) postulates. Similarly classical electrodynamics can be reduced to Maxwell's equations and Lorentz force law, and special relativity is ...
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1answer
160 views

Difference between a law and a theory [duplicate]

What is the difference between a law and a theory? Some seem to think that a law is a single relationship or a single equation, while a theory is an explanatory framework in which these laws come ...
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1answer
40 views

Could the equations of physics evolve over time? [duplicate]

Current equations describe everything pretty well but there are some issues considering inflation, quantum gravity, black holes,... How would we be able to verify that these do not evolve over long ...
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1answer
115 views

Non-negotiable laws in physics [closed]

Are there laws (axioms / principles / equations / inequalities) in physics that cannot be violated, no matter how slightly, by hand without leading to absurdities (singularities, inconsistencies)?
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3answers
75 views

Need an example of an experiment highlighting Time translation Symmetry

So I have been doing some research on different types of continous symmetries (mainly interested in continuous symmetry since I have been learning abit about Noethers theorem.) and understand the ...
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3answers
101 views

How Newton's laws replicate themselves on a larger scale?

Now I was reading The Feynman Lectures on Physics and found this which I found somewhat peculiar and deep and thus want your assistance here. So here it goes: The theorem concerning the motion of ...
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0answers
47 views

Expansion of the universe & laws of physics [duplicate]

Does the expansion of the universe have an effect on the laws of physics, or the constants used in physics? If we were to imagine the universe 40 billion years later, would the same laws still apply?
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1answer
51 views

Can the universe operate on a totally different set of laws? [closed]

Recently, I learnt that there are many, many mathematically consistent set of universal laws. How would a universe based on a totally different set of laws look like? What are the mathematical ...
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6answers
995 views

Universality of the laws of physics

How is it known at any point in the space of this universe that there is no particle in which its gravitational force does not follow Newton's law or other current laws? How does the same matter ...
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1answer
121 views

Why physical laws always have curves for solutions?

Many physical laws are formulated as differential equations. Parabolic equations have parabola as a solution, elliptic equation an ellipse, hyperbolic an hyperbola. All these solutions are curves, ...
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1answer
75 views

Do physical laws require 2nd derivatives [duplicate]

Is it a happy coincidence that second degree differential equations approximate reality or a necessity? They describe how a system will evolve from one state to the next, but surely the ultimate laws ...
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3answers
716 views

Why is conservation of angular momentum considered a law?

We know that angular momentum is defined as the cross product of position and linear momentum. By taking the time derivative, we can deduce that the time rate of change of the angular momentum equals ...
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2answers
605 views

What is governing the laws of physics? [closed]

What makes all the laws of physics do what they do? What is the governor of all of those laws?
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3answers
351 views

Regardless of the multiverse. How are our constants and laws communicated across our universe, and my bathroom?

Assuming the multiverse theory is true, then each universe has a different set of constants and it provides a reasonable explanation as to why the constants in our universe seem set 'just right' for ...
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4answers
6k views

Why does increasing resistance decrease the heat produced in an electric circuit?

If $H=\frac{V^2}{R}{t}$ ,then increasing resistance means decreasing the heat produced. But, isnt it that the heat in a circuit is produced due to the presence of resistors? Moreover metals with ...
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4answers
1k views

Justification of Physical Laws [closed]

I'm a maths student, and I've studied quite a lot of mathematical physics. All my courses have a similar style - we state the laws of the system, and then deduce the physical consequences as theorems. ...
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3answers
659 views

About time and time dilation [closed]

This question is related to this answer of John Rennie. He says: The length of the red line is the same in both figure 1 and figure 2 I guess his meaning of red line is the space-time distance ...
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3answers
1k views

Do we not need a Zeroth Law of motion similar to the Zeroth Law of Thermodynamics? [closed]

Is the Zeroth Law of Thermodynamics necessary? If so, then do we need a similar law for motion?
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3answers
127 views

Can we have a physics by using other mathematics except calculus? [closed]

We (I) always have been said that we don't need to real values, we just need to differences. For example, $\mathrm du=C_v\mathrm dT$ and $\Delta u=\int_{T_1}^{T_2}C_v\mathrm dT$. So, I have some ...
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3answers
1k views

Is a theory the same as a hypothesis? [duplicate]

“Any physical theory is always provisional, in the sense that it is only a hypothesis: you can never prove it.” Excerpt from Stephen Hawking, A Brief History of Time, iBooks. So does that mean ...