Questions tagged [laws-of-physics]

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Why are most physical laws dependent on small powers?

The equation with the highest exponent I could find was the coefficient of energy loss of light scattered in an optical fiber: $$ {\displaystyle \alpha _{\text{scat}}={\frac {8\pi ^{3}}{3\lambda ^{4}}}...
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Could some kind of vacuum decay modify the most fundamental laws of physics?

A false vacuum is a hypothetical vacuum that is not actively decaying, but somewhat yet not entirely stable ("metastable"). It may last for a very long time in that state, and might ...
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Physical and non-physical solutions to Einstein's field equations

Einstein predicted gravitational waves in 1916 as a solution to his field equations. Apart from doing experiments, is it possible to tell which solutions exist in the real world and which don't? Are ...
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Locus of a moving mass point

Two very small mass particles $m_1$, $m_2$ are connected by a $2l$ long, infinitely soft and inelastic thread without mass. The initial condition of the system before being freely released is as in ...
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Are there any Big Bounce models where the laws of physics (even the most fundamental ones) would change between cycles?

Big Crunch-Big Bang models (usually called Big Bounce models or cosmological oscillatory models) are highly unlikely to happen due to the discovery of the accelerated expansion of the universe. But ...
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What physical laws differs in non inertial frame

For me physical laws should be observers independent, what should be depend on the observers are measurements. But one of the postulates of Special relativity is that all laws of physics should be ...
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Justification of the State Postulate

I have just started thermodynamics (not with statistical approach but with macroscopic approach), in which the state postulate reads Only two independent intensive properties of a simple ...
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Other Hubble spheres with no Lorentz symmetry?

Perhaps this is a stupid question but, if Lorentz symmetry is not global but rather local, wouldn't that mean that is possible that other Hubble spheres outside our observable universe could have ...
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1 answer
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Local nature of physical laws

All the laws in physics are local in nature and that's why their formulation follows differential equations. My doubt is whether the locality is a proven theorem or it is a postulate?
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If Lorentz invariance and the quantum-mechanical unitarity of time evolution would be emergent, wouldn't that mean that all physics is emergent?

I have read that Lorentz invariance and the quantum-mechanical unitarity of time evolution are the foundation of all modern physics. So, if somehow these were not fundamental characteristics of nature ...
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Are the different fields in multi-field inflation described by different Lagrangians?

The most simple models of cosmological inflation consider only one scalar field. However, there are more complex models (like hybrid inflation or multi-field inflation) which consider more than one ...
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Binnig's fractal evolution applied to multiple universes?

Gerd Binnig, Nobel laureate in physics in 1986, proposed in his article "The fractal structure of evolution" 1 that everything in the universe, including its laws, had changed and became ...
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Are there other theories (apart from string theory) that combined with inflation, would produce universes with different laws?

In chaotic inflation, space would stop expanding in some points, creating hubble volumes that could experience different spontaneous symmetry breaking, which would result in different properties, such ...
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Would any continuous model of the universe have/be based on hypercomputational laws?

I've read that when Turing-Church thesis is applied to the universe and physics, one of the three interpretations that we can use and is defended by some important physicists is that: "The universe ...
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