Stack Exchange Network

Stack Exchange network consists of 174 Q&A communities including Stack Overflow, the largest, most trusted online community for developers to learn, share their knowledge, and build their careers.

Visit Stack Exchange

Questions tagged [terminology]

Use this for questions relating to the proper use of physics terminology or nomenclature.

-1
votes
0answers
21 views

Mode in quantum mechanic

Let suppose we have $N$ identical composite particles at ground level. Each composite particle have two distinguishable particles. Thus the state of composite bosons in ground state can be written as ...
0
votes
0answers
36 views

What is a fuzzy space?

Can someone give a down-to-earth explanation of what is a fuzzy space? (As known from M-theory and noncommutative geometry)
0
votes
2answers
61 views

Terminology for how bendable an object is and what affects the bendable-ness of an object

I was wondering what the term is for how bendable an object is. Also, does this feature vary depending on the thickness of the object? Say, for example, I want to know how bendable a ruler is. Does ...
1
vote
0answers
47 views

What is meant by finite harmonic oscillator?

What does it mean to take finite harmonic oscillator, In research article "http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1367-2630/17/11/113015 ", we were finding effective number of cobosons in ...
1
vote
1answer
33 views

Should the rest frame of a lab positioned on a gravitating body be considered an inertial frame in special relativity or not?

In Newtonian Mechanics, the rest frame of a lab on the Earth is considered to be (approximately) an inertial frame. The fact that a thrown ball is not moving on a straight line corresponds to the ...
-1
votes
2answers
77 views

Why is quantum mechanics called quantum *mechanics*? [closed]

At least a few books have "Quantum Mechanics" in their title, e.g., Sakurai's Modern Quantum Mechanics. However, I don't think measuring spin, which is "the" way of introducing quantum mechanics, ...
0
votes
0answers
32 views

Who first used the terminology of “on-shell” and “off-shell”?

By 1915 Klein and Hilbert dealt with the issue (and I do not claim they were the first). They distinguished between what follows for GR purely from the geometry of spacetime (notably, the first ...
0
votes
0answers
13 views

What does infinite-mass limit mean in the context of Effective Field Theory (EFT)?

I came across this term in section 2.1 of the paper Weak Gravity Conjecture From Low Energy Observers’ Perspective. 2.1 Heavy Particle Effective Theory (HPET) ... The starting idea for ...
0
votes
0answers
33 views

Difference between ideal gas and perfect gas?

I tried seaching it in the internet but I didn't understand anything. I know the definition of ideal gas. But I don't understand what perfect gas is. Can you help me, please?
1
vote
1answer
41 views

What is a hypercomplex quantity?

An extract from the book "Quantum Mechanics and the Path Integrals" by Richard P. Feynman and A. R. Hibbs: We can state the correct law for $P(x)$ mathematically by saying that $P(x)$ is the ...
0
votes
0answers
10 views

Where does the prefix “super” from “supersymmetry” come from? [migrated]

Where does the prefix "super" from "supersymmetry" come from?
1
vote
2answers
111 views

What is meant by the absolute scale of the neutrino mass?

In this review titled "Pieces of the Flavour Puzzle" the author Ferruccio Feruglio wrote in the introduction that "The origin of the parameters in the flavour sector of the Standard Model (SM), ...
1
vote
1answer
41 views

Is there a standard convention for whether the term “handedness” refers to helicity or chirality?

I was under the impression that the "handedness" of a massive spin-1/2 particle refers to its chirality rather than its helicity. This answer, this one and Srednicki's QFT textbook seem to use the ...
1
vote
1answer
67 views

Models in physics [closed]

As I said in another question I am just a physics enthusiast so I am sorry for my very poor knowledge. What is meant by models in physics? what is their function and why physicists imply them? Are ...
1
vote
1answer
32 views

What is the term for the light-sensitive metals in the photoelectric effect?

Can anyone please tell me the term used to refer to metals such as those used in photoelectric effect which can generate a current from light?
0
votes
1answer
30 views

Adiabatic Availability?

In the textbook "Thermodynamics: Foundations and Applications" by Elias P. Gyftopoulas and Gian Paolo Beretta (Dover). In chapter 5, on page 73 (section 5.3) the book says: Adiabatic availability ...
2
votes
1answer
28 views

How to concisely state 'atmospheric conditions' without being ambiguous with STP?

I'm conducting an experiment in an open system, so the temperature and pressure is equal to that of the atmosphere at that time. However, it is not equal to STP conditions of $273 \; \mathrm{K}$ and $...
0
votes
1answer
45 views

About the quadratures method

in the Classical Mechanics (2nd. Ed.) book of Herbert Goldstein, p. 75 it says: "Equations 3-18 and 3-20 are the two remaining integrations, and formally the problem has been reduced to quadratures..."...
0
votes
0answers
17 views

What are the differences between magnetometers, teslameters and gaussmeters?

What are the differences between magnetometers, teslameters and gaussmeters? I think that teslameter and gaussmeter are the same thing, but I am not sure about that either.
1
vote
1answer
71 views

What is the wave field functional?

I was reading on some QFT and I came across the following paragraph: In the same way that a generic state $|\psi\rangle$ of a particle can be described by giving its overlap with all the possible ...
2
votes
2answers
62 views

Modes in optical fibers

I am trying to understand the modes in step-index optical fibers and I saw that they say the electric field distribution in the core and cladding is as bellow. my question is that which component of ...
6
votes
4answers
201 views

Shouldn't “speed of light” really be “speed of electromagnetic waves”?

Since all electromagnetic waves travel at the speed of light ... shouldn't its name be Speed of Electromagnetic wave?
0
votes
2answers
127 views

If an object moves at constant speed, does it necessarily have constant velocity? [closed]

If an object moves at constant speed, does it necessarily have constant velocity?
1
vote
0answers
25 views

Is there a term for the study of asteroids?

I'm trying to find the name for the academic specialty of studying asteroids, but I can't seem to find any. For example, there is a distinct wikipedia page for "Planet" vs "Planetary science". Is ...
0
votes
0answers
10 views

What is gradient-flow modified operators in thermal gauge theory?

This is going to be a very "soft-question". I do not fully understand German, so I am not sure if "Korrelationsfunktionen mit Gradientfluss modifizierten Operatoren bei endlicher Temperatur in ...
0
votes
2answers
27 views

What are pre collisions and post collisions in forces and momentum?

What are pre collision and post collision exactly? I assume it is before collision and after collision. I can not find an answer on google.
1
vote
4answers
91 views

Is there an agreed upon physics definition of the term 'speed'?--for example, can it be negative?

The term speed is commonly defined as follows: https://www.physicsclassroom.com/class/1DKin/Lesson-1/Scalars-and-Vectors Speed, being a scalar quantity, is the rate at which an object covers ...
2
votes
1answer
50 views

Kepler's Second Law: Why do we calculate the area of a triangle rather than the area of a sector?

Kepler's Second Law states that equal areas are swept in equal times. When calculating this area, why do we use the formula for the area of a triangle rather than the area of a sector?
0
votes
1answer
11 views

What is NLL in MC of SM/BSM?

I know that NLO represents using Next to Leading Order Feynman diagrams for a more accurate calculation. And similarly NNLO being Next to Next to Leading Oder. I am wondering what NLL is an acronym ...
1
vote
1answer
35 views

Wess-Zumino model: simplified vs non-simplified?

According to Ryder Quantum Field Theory page 440 the "simplified Wess-Zumino model" has the lagrangian $$ \mathscr{L} = \frac{1}{2}(\partial_\mu A)^2 + \frac{1}{2}(\partial_\mu B)^2 + \frac{1}{4} \...
1
vote
1answer
30 views

Isn't end-centered monoclinic same as monoclinic?

monoclinic is simply an extruded parallelogram. If we place end centers on parallelogram faces then taking half of both diagonals and same height as before as 3 basis, its the same. That's what I ...
-1
votes
1answer
36 views

about the muscle's tension's variables

I'm reading the paper "The Problem of the Interrelation of Coordination and Localization", which is written by N. Bernstein. The paper says, The degree of tension of a muscle is a function, in the ...
3
votes
1answer
49 views

Mathematical term for the on/off gradient functions in MRI imaging

The slice selection gradients, as well as the phase and frequency, in MRI imaging are traditionally represented by on/off box or rectangular symbols: or My question is what is the mathematical name ...
5
votes
1answer
182 views

Truncated $N$-Point Functions

In Quantum Field Theory, truncated N-Point functions (or truncated Green's functions) are the N-Point functions of diagrams with their external legs chopped off. I was told that the truncated N-Point ...
1
vote
2answers
77 views

What does “as small as a fraction of an angstrom” mean?

I was reading my school textbook in which the following statement was given: The resolution of such an electron microscope is limited finally by the fact that electrons can also behave as waves! (...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

What is a serendipitous survey?

Sometimes I have found the term "serendipitous survey" in astrophysics articles or reviews (e.g. Brandt & Alexander 2015). I don't understand what it means, and what is the difference from a "...
2
votes
1answer
63 views

What is kinetic theory?

What is kinetic theory? I am taking a course on fluid dynamics right now, and I have been wondering about one thing for some time now. We have three ways to look at a gas ($N$ particles): 1) ...
8
votes
2answers
103 views

Meaning of the word 'canonical' in physics

I often encounter the term canonical in my study of physics. What does it mean? There is canonical momentum, canonical transformations and I have even heard the phrase 'proving something more ...
2
votes
1answer
47 views

Is there a name for this phenomenon?

Imagine I have a cylindrical pipe closed on both ends with lids. I fill it with sand and compress the sand tightly. Now I hold the cylinder vertically and remove the bottom lid. The sand will counter ...
0
votes
0answers
58 views

Phase space meaning [duplicate]

In the field of medical physics, specifically in monte carlo simulation of radiation beams produced by electron accelerators, people call ‘phase space’ to a file that contains the data of a large ...
0
votes
2answers
56 views

Four-vectors in relativity

I have a question about specifically whether the components of a 4-vector could depend on the position $x \in \mathcal{R}^4$, where I denote Minkowski space with $\mathcal{R}^4$. I know that the ...
0
votes
1answer
40 views

Quantum state space constructing operator

If I use British money the amounts I can have are isomorphic to $\mathbb{Z}_{\geq0}$ (in pennies). If I also use Australian money, if I want to think about the amount I have in total, I can use ...
1
vote
0answers
38 views

Quasi Static Reversibility Theorem

As far as I know, the definition of a reversible process is simply "a process that can be reversed". Meaning, that for an isolated global system containing the subsystem in question, its thermodynamic ...
6
votes
0answers
50 views

Why is equipartition law called a theorem too, in some books? [closed]

In some books, the equipartition law is called a theorem. But a law is an observation, and cannot be proved. On the other hand, a theorem is something established using earlier assertions. So what ...
-1
votes
1answer
40 views

What does it mean for event generation and event reconstruction in Experimental Particle physics? [closed]

I want to do data analysis and there are some processes called event generation and event reconstruction. I want to know these terms that what does it mean in particle collider? Please guide me.
0
votes
1answer
39 views

Large Lorentz Boost

I understand the general concept of a lorentz transformation and a lorentz boost. What does it mean for a lorentz boost to be large however? My current guess is that this is referring to a large ...
1
vote
2answers
88 views

Is $\delta(r-ct)/4\pi r$, the 3D wave equation elementary solution, a transverse or longitudinal wave?

Background: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Longitudinal_wave 'Longitudinal waves are waves in which the displacement of the medium is in the same direction as, or the opposite direction to, the ...
3
votes
1answer
73 views

What is the 'state space' of a quantum field theory called?

This is just a terminological question, not a question about reality or mathematics. I often want to talk about state spaces in quantum field theory. For example the space of [all possible vector ...
0
votes
2answers
80 views

“Now-plane” of a particle

I am currently reading the book "Classical charge particle" by Fritz Rohrlich, and I struggle a lot with the appendix "space-like planes and Gauss's integral theorem". He says "the world line of a ...
0
votes
2answers
157 views

Is quantum field theory a field theory of quantum mechanics or a quantum theory of fields?

Quantum field theory can describe and extend phenomena of classical fields, such as electromagnetism. I had assumed for a long time that it was itself a "field theory", by which I mean it is a set of ...