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Which field of computing looks more promising, the biological computers that have been springing up or quantum computers? [closed]

Hello this is my first question on this site so thank you for taking a look. Anyways as an aspiring electrical engineer I try my best to keep up with the current trends. Such that I’ve noticed two ...
Arthuro Cisneros's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
30 views

How can a quantum gate be constructed to evaluate a blackbox function (as in the Deutsch's algorithm)?

The standard Deutsch's algorithm uses a control-U gate, which takes the control qubit state $x$ as input to get the output from a black-box function $f(x)$. And the output modifies the quantum state ...
Yuan John Jiang's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
56 views

Wouldn't photonic computers be larger, not much faster?

I hear a lot about photonic computing as a possible alternative to transistor-based computing. However transistors are already much smaller than the wavelength of optical light. Wouldn't optical ...
user34722's user avatar
  • 2,504
1 vote
2 answers
136 views

Entropy and information - Heat generation in computers

I understand that part of the heat release from a computer comes from resistive heating, but to my understanding it is also linked to entropy changes and information - such that even a superconducting ...
Woodenplank's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
28 views

Frequency of EMR vs clockspeed of a processor

I was recently reading this thread on Reddit where people discussed the implications of a "Terahertz processor", a computer processor that operates at a clockspeed of greater than 1 ...
Abced Decba's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
62 views

Can we tell that the ability of computers to make a decision is based on a quantum property? [closed]

Can we say the ability of computers to make decisions is based on a quantum property? I refer to the PN junction in semiconductors, is the phenomena related to PN junction a quantum property? Why I ...
CoffeDeveloper's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
50 views

Can computers recieve data wirelessly without being powered? [closed]

I'm not sure if this question totally fits here, but I think this is the best SE for it. Traditionally, to connect to the internet (a server), a computer must be on: powered and running. This means ...
Andrew Baker's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
151 views

State Spaces in Classical vs Quantum systems, in the context of classical & quantum computers

I am currently reading "Quantum Computing: A Gentle Introduction" by Rieffel & Polak. In describing the difference between classical and quantum state spaces, they say: In classical ...
Schoppe's user avatar
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3 votes
0 answers
43 views

Are there any specifications required for the computer which would be connected to Computer Automated Measurement and Control (CAMAC)?

I wanna buy a computer to use with Computer Automated Measurement and Control (CAMAC). Are there any specifications required for the computer which would be connected to CAMAC?
Winston Myler's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
114 views

Quantumly hard problem but classically easy [closed]

It is usually said that the quantum computer can solve classically hard problem but quantumly easy. See for example the Preskill video. Are there important problems of the opposite: the classical ...
Марина Marina S's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
129 views

Why can't we search string vacua by computer?

I am imagining this: A database of Calabi-Yau manifolds. More can be added when more are found. The software picks a random CY manifold, assigns random fluxes etc. It looks at the low energy sector ...
user avatar
0 votes
4 answers
155 views

Why are computers much smaller than they are fast?

In any medium there is a finite propagation speed at which information can spread. Special relativity provides an upper bound to that propagation speed, namely the speed of light in vacuum. Signals of ...
Andi Bauer's user avatar
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0 answers
83 views

How to calculate Distance $D$ to object from a camera with known $H$?

I am using algorithm to draw a bounding box around object when they appear in camera as shown in attached image. The main confusion is that i consider the object closer to camera when the Distance $D$ ...
Ali Waqas's user avatar
  • 101
-17 votes
2 answers
433 views

Can (and should) wifi internet be considered a force? [closed]

I've recently been using my wifi internet, for the last few years and have been enjoying it very much. I am able to communicate with my family across the globe in mere seconds, it's obviously a marvel ...
saccharomycescerevisiae's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
66 views

Is there a computing process heavily dependent on the principles of gravity? [closed]

Most of the current and future computing technology depends on the application of physics of subatomic entities (electrodynamics and quantum mechanics). Since we haven't explored the gravitational ...
Manish Kumar Singh's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
164 views

Does a CPU do work?

This question is simple to the Core (excuse the pun). CPU = Central Processing Unit (for computing) Lots of people including myself say "My CPU is doing a lot of work." But I do not think ...
TheArchitecta's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
1k views

Why do LCD pixels at the very edges of the screen "disappear" when looking at a shallow angle?

I've noticed something curious about my LCD screens (one of them is a TUF VG32VQ1B and the other an AOC I2269VW, if it makes a difference): If I look at them at a shallow angle, any bright line of ...
Kroltan's user avatar
  • 89
4 votes
1 answer
263 views

Computers, quantum information and computational complexity in Kerr-AdS black hole backgrounds

A Kerr-AdS black hole is eternal, never evaporates and has a Malament-Hogarth metric. Bob, a universally programmable reversible classical computer with a fixed maximum memory who only outputs one ...
QGR's user avatar
  • 2,337
3 votes
1 answer
188 views

Can artificial neural networks be effective theories?

Wikipedia describes "effective theories" as follows. In science, an effective theory is a scientific theory which proposes to describe a certain set of observations, but explicitly without ...
Galen's user avatar
  • 326
-1 votes
2 answers
120 views

Do all physical processes necessarily imply a computation is taking place? [closed]

I would like to understand if any and all physical processes taking place, necessarily imply computations are also taking place. As a motivating scenario for the question, consider the following: ...
tamale's user avatar
  • 123
-1 votes
2 answers
132 views

Informational content of a single symbol

In the communication context, every book i've started to read says: if you want to send a datum about a random experiment $X$, let it be a fair coin toss, that is $$p(tails)=p=0.5; p(heads)=q=0.5$$ ...
coobit's user avatar
  • 957
2 votes
4 answers
267 views

Computer analogy to non-locality in quantum mechanics

It is not uncommon to say that the non-locality of quantum mechanics is equivalent to the following computer analogy: if you are trying to model an entangled two spin system, then even if the spins ...
user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
235 views

Computers That Can Compute in Femtoseconds

I was watching a video about LCLS 2 and they mentioned that they can shoot and record up to 1 million x-ray pulses allowing them to see chemical reactions. They said that these pulses of x-ray last ...
DragonflyRobotics's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
378 views

What are the technological limitations of DNA computing? [closed]

IBM and Microsoft are studying the application of DNA computing, but I was wondering what are the technological limitations that prevent it from being used in the same way as a conventional digital ...
Sayaman's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
117 views

Do laptops become slow due to the second law of thermodynamics? Is it inevitable that classical or quantum computers will get slower over time? [closed]

The large scale composition of solid devices which comprise the hardware structure of modern computers are subject to the second law of thermodynamics as are all other physical objects. Assuming the ...
kbakshi314's user avatar
  • 2,402
2 votes
1 answer
43 views

Does uncopying an information requires a copy of the same program in this scheme? If so, how?

In the paper Information is Physical by Rolf Landauer (reference), it is claimed that Uncopying is not equivalent to erasure and, just like copying, can be done with a dissipation per step ...
Our's user avatar
  • 2,283
5 votes
1 answer
567 views

What makes a Quantum Computer Faster for solving specific problems?

I have an undergraduate understanding of Quantum Mechanics (or at least of whatever is covered in Griffith's) and the idea of a Quantum Computer sounds really interesting but I am having some trouble ...
d128's user avatar
  • 173
5 votes
2 answers
1k views

How can the universe be a computation?

A few physicists (or computer scientists) take it for granted that the universe is a computation. However, I am not able to understand how the universe CAN be a computation in the first place. I come ...
shivams's user avatar
  • 661
-3 votes
2 answers
495 views

Could the world be represented as binary? [duplicate]

The Matrix the movie regards the whole world as being binary and us living in a computer simulation. Could the world be represented as binary similar to a matrix or is that not practical give quantum ...
Bob's user avatar
  • 11
4 votes
3 answers
380 views

Are quantum computers able to simulate every physical process that a classical one can simulate?

I edited the question since this comment was (rightly) made: There are few things that are more annoying than questions where the question text is not self-contained. So: Quantum supremacy has been ...
Deschele Schilder's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
487 views

How does a photonic tensor core work?

There has been much media coverage of the paper Photonic Tensor Cores for Machine Learning: https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/gadgets-and-tech/news/ai-machine-learning-light-speed-artificial-...
Jonas Sourlier's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
48 views

Computations and physical processes

Can computation be accomplished using any physical process? For simplicity let me restrict myself to the computation of performing addition. I am aware that mechanical calculators just use Newtonian ...
Varun Premkumar's user avatar
0 votes
5 answers
1k views

How many parallel processes does a Quantum Computer Have?

I know that quantum computers have a extremely large capacity to do many different calculations at once, but how many different calculations? Is it infinite, like I've heard some articles say, or is ...
Christopher Gilbert's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
54 views

What are the fundamental limits to the temperature produced by computation?

Wikipedia has a list of limits to computation: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Limits_of_computation These limits seem to mostly be really high bounds based on entropy considerations and so on, but a ...
Axion's user avatar
  • 113
0 votes
2 answers
63 views

How can I make sense of the way (screen) colors are generated? [duplicate]

OK here is some common knowledge I have from the net: a computer screen has 3 constituent colors of red, green, blue. To make all spectra of stuffs it just combines them. We also know that red is ...
longtry's user avatar
  • 191
2 votes
1 answer
71 views

Is there a common mathematical foundation for quantum and classical computation?

Is there a (natural) formalism that neatly and insightfully includes classical and quantum computation? I have a mostly sound basis in quantum mechanics (as a physics grad), and a much less sound but ...
user6873235's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
397 views

Resource recommendation for machine learning

I am planning to change my field (in PhD) and learn Machine Learning to differentiate different phases of strongly correlated matter. I learned Monte Carlo method in my MS and have intermediate level ...
2 votes
1 answer
373 views

Universe simulation

Is it theoretically possible to simulate the universe? I know that some philosophical theories say that our universe is a computer simulation, but is this feasible? Would it ever be possible for a ...
Jonh Smith's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
529 views

Train Physics Simulation

It's my first time asking here so bear with me. I'm a computer scientist, and I'm working on a train simulator project. I'm having quite a difficult time understanding all the physics and formulas ...
Feuerschwinge94's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
247 views

Which system for a quantum computer?

We are aware that we use binary system for our present day digital computers as they comprise of two states (0&1). But what system would fit the states of a quantum computer?
Charlie Gogoi's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
54 views

What's wrong with this method of solving NP problems using a quantum computer?

As far as we know, Quantum Computers can not solve arbitrary NP problems in polynomial time. I have what appears to be a solution, but it is obviously to simple to be correct, since otherwise the ...
Christopher King's user avatar
10 votes
0 answers
548 views

Using a time-like boundary as a computer?

Question and Summary Using classical calculations and the Robin boundary condition I show that one calculates the anti-derivative of a function within time $2X$ (I can compute an integral below) $$\...
More Anonymous's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
20 views

What influences the variance of signal transmission speed?

I'm currently thinking about the various sources that influence time when it is synchronized with the NTP protocol. One of them is the physical layer (OSI-model). When sending a bit over a cable, ...
Martin Thoma's user avatar
-5 votes
2 answers
188 views

Can we simulate whole universe with infinite size of RAM and modern computer? [duplicate]

If modern computers are universal turing machines and C language is turing complete, theoretically we could calculate and simulate every problem in the universe then theoritically we can simulate ...
Kadir Susuz's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
64 views

Can quantitative model explain away our world? [duplicate]

So, for the sake of argument, let us assume that we have sufficient computational power and brightest scientists. Can we explain/predict every aspect and event of our universe with quantitative model? ...
Chanseok Oh's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
544 views

Quantum computer vs. classical probabilistic computer

Is it possible to make a quantum computer from a perfect random number generator. I'm wondering if anybody that's studied it could make one from that type of random number generator.
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
918 views

Supposed we proved that we lived in a simulation. What are some of the current clues we would use to help us acknowledge this? [duplicate]

Suppose that there was a headline in every newspaper that said that science has now proven that we do indeed live in a simulation, without any doubt. Or, some godlike aliens that created our ...
Tazz250's user avatar
  • 55
0 votes
1 answer
70 views

In hard disk drive, what exactly happen when we delete informations from our computer? [closed]

I thought that this question should be asked at some computer/information websites, but since I was researching about physical concepts in hard disk drive, maybe asking here can be a good idea. :P ...
Steve0320's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
94 views

Can a quantum computer implement a classical one?

The normal question about this topic would be: Can a classical computer implement a quantum computer? But now I wonder the exact opposite: can a quantum computer implement a classical one? Can we say ...
belchior's user avatar
-2 votes
3 answers
1k views

Is Physics Computable? [closed]

Is it possible for a Turing machine to simulate physics accurately?   For the problem of reals, I was thinking of the following: For each real, $2^1, 2^2, ...., 2^n, ...$ memory cells store the ...
Tobi Alafin's user avatar