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Scalar QED atoms - will they pass through each other?

This question is unanswerable and too hypothetical. Nevertheless, trying and failing can elucidate some principles. The title "scalar QED". Once you bring in QED, as decidedly not scalar ...
JEB's user avatar
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3 votes

Does QED explain why Moving charge produce magnetic field?

It's actually the other way round. Maxwell's equations explain why a moving charge produces a magnetic field, and we get quantum electrodynamics by quantising Maxwell's equations. The link between ...
John Rennie's user avatar
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Destructive interference pattern perpendicular to photon's propagation direction

No it can not exist. In high school you learn that 2 waves cancel, but this is not physics it is only mathematics. Energy is never absorbed or destroyed in the medium, water waves seem to cancel but ...
PhysicsDave's user avatar
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QED: Structure of electron vertex function in the massless limit

The form factor you wrote in terms of A and B is exact to all loop orders, because all that went into it was the symmetries of the relevant fields (which is non-perturbative information). Additionally,...
11zaq's user avatar
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What happens if obstacles (walls) been put where destructive interference occurs in double slit experiment?

On wikimedia commons the description of the image that you used as illustration is described as: Simulation of the double-slit experiment with electron Of course, that doesn't detract from your ...
Cleonis's user avatar
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Why is $F_1(0) = 1$? (form factor in QED)

You're free to rescale what you mean by a form factor so that $F_1(0)=g$, where $g$ is just whatever number you end up getting. By form factor $F_1$, I essentially mean the coefficient of $A_\mu \bar{\...
11zaq's user avatar
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Understanding attractive/repulsive boson-mediated forces based on interference of free-space fields

By the CPT theorem, antiparticles can be thought of as normal particles travelling backwards in time. A scalar mediator doesn't see the difference between the two because it doesn't have any way to ...
11zaq's user avatar
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1 vote

Understanding attractive/repulsive boson-mediated forces based on interference of free-space fields

The crucial difference is that in the Yukawa interaction we have no $\eta_{\mu\nu}$ in the scalar propagator $\frac{\operatorname{i}}{p^2-m^2+\operatorname{i}\epsilon}$ and the vertex. We therefore ...
Silas's user avatar
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Can an electron be produced inside a proton?

Yes, the proton structure includes electrons and positrons, but their contribution is negligible because electromagnetism is so much weaker than the strong interaction that produces the proton's quark-...
David Bailey's user avatar
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3 votes

Can an electron be produced inside a proton?

Simply put, if you are thinking of "being in the proton" as simply having a ghostly appearance in the form of loop diagrams with processes like $\gamma\to e^\pm$, sure nothing prevents such ...
Mike's user avatar
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Most general non-relativistic Hamiltonian for hydrogenic atom in quantised electromagnetic field

I think the answer to your question is in the bound state QED formulation. If you want to go to the formulation of the bound state problem you will find it here in this paper by furry, which is an ...
Laserrager's user avatar

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