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2 votes

Is work done by a charged particle not gauge invariant?

You are correct that the expression $q\phi$ is not gauge invariant. Only expressions in E and B are, with the caveat that B does not contribute to the work except if it is time dependent. Then it is ...
my2cts's user avatar
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12 votes

Is work done by a charged particle not gauge invariant?

Good question! Let's go by parts. The definition of electric work is $$ W_{x_1 \to x_2} = q \int_{x_1}^{x_2} d\mathbf{r}\cdot\mathbf{E},\tag{1} $$ which in the $\mathbf{A = 0}$ case (not the static ...
Gabriel Ybarra Marcaida's user avatar
0 votes

Relation between the number of curvature functions and dimensions in GR

In general relativity, we usually exploit this freedom when choosing a gauge. This is very common when dealing with gravitational waves. My example will be focused on gravitational waves. I'll take ...
Níckolas Alves's user avatar
1 vote

How is Wald deriving this Gauge condition: $\partial^b\, \overline{\gamma}_{ab} = 0$?

Briefly speaking, one chooses rather than derives a gauge-fixing condition (aka. a gauge), such that it intersects each gauge-orbit exactly once. The Lorenz/de Donder/harmonic gauge (4.4.11) is a ...
Qmechanic's user avatar
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