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How does a free electron look like?

It is a very interesting topic, I have asked myself the question also. The Gaussian form provided by Sean is wrong: it does not fit with the Schrödinger or even Dirac free-electron equation (with no ...
fefetltl's user avatar
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Why don't positively charged metal ions (in a wire) move but electrons do?

In a zero resistance DC power line electrons keep on moving without accelerating, because there is no electric field inside the wire. In a zero resistance DC power line ions keep on staying still ...
stuffu's user avatar
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3 votes

Why don't positively charged metal ions (in a wire) move but electrons do?

The question is why the ions are localised and form a lattice, unlike the electrons. The reason is that they are typically 10000-100000 times heavier than electrons. Therefore they have very small, ...
my2cts's user avatar
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2 votes
Accepted

Why don't positively charged metal ions (in a wire) move but electrons do?

To answer this question, it is necessary to understand the structure of the metal at the atomic scale. A very simple way to see it is that the positively charged nuclei sit at fixed points in a ...
paulina's user avatar
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2 votes

Why don't positively charged metal ions (in a wire) move but electrons do?

It’s because the ions aren’t delocalized like the electrons are.
Hannah's user avatar
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5 votes

What happens after electrons get ejected in the photoelectric effect?

The photoelectric effect liberates the electron from whatever is holding it: metal surface, valence band, atomic shell, ... What happens next depends on what's around. In the classic textbook ...
John Doty's user avatar
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Experimental Assignment of Electronic Transitions in Atoms (Grotrian Diagram)

Here's how I would do it. Pick a high wavenumber transition. That has just set the relative energy difference between two levels. Search through the rest of the transitions for two that add up to the ...
Dr. Nate's user avatar
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1 vote

Why don't atoms constantly emit electromagnetic radiation?

Wouldn't even the electron cloud/probability density of diffuse charge still emit EM radiation If the atom is under influence of some radiation (which is almost always the case), then yes, it will ...
Ján Lalinský's user avatar
1 vote

Why don't atoms constantly emit electromagnetic radiation?

An atom in an environment of zero Kelvin would not radiate. In all realistic cases, an atom receives (absorbs) photons and sends (emits) photons. The emission number and the frequencies of the photons ...
HolgerFiedler's user avatar
1 vote

Why don't atoms constantly emit electromagnetic radiation?

To expand on the answer offered by Dale... Now introducing the concept that an atom is constantly vibrating due to thermal energy, except at absolute zero Kelvin. This is perhaps the first ...
somebody0's user avatar
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3 votes

Why don't atoms constantly emit electromagnetic radiation?

Now introducing the concept that an atom is constantly vibrating due to thermal energy, except at absolute zero Kelvin. Wouldn't even the electron cloud/probability density of diffuse charge still ...
Dale's user avatar
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1 vote

Can the kinetic energy of electrons be quenched by destroying coherence?

At least in the case of Moire superlattice of twisted bilayer, the momentum of electrons is reduced and the kinetc energy is quenched, but coherence of electrons isn't destroyed.
physhy's user avatar
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Why is current the same when batteries are connected in series?

Gentlemen, thank you all, the answers were there all along; I was lost, but now I am found. After wrestling with this thought for some time, I have finally arrived at a clear understanding. My initial ...
DPV's user avatar
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