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Can it be disproven that an electron is a wave packet of photons?

As mentioned in the comments, photons are neutral, so no collection of photons can have charge $-1$; moreover, they are spin 1, so no collection of photons can have spin $\frac 1 2$. Meanwhile equal ...
JEB's user avatar
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Can it be disproven that an electron is a wave packet of photons?

In physics we prove things by testing them experimentally. You already seem to know what the experiments say. Our current (very accurate) model of quantum electrodynamic phenomena doesn't support your ...
John Doty's user avatar
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How do you experimentally determine the value of the Compton edge from data?

To find the Compton edge from data, you need the help of a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of your detector setup using GEANT4 or MCNPX. Your Monte Carlo will show the sharp falling Compton edge (Klein-...
rafi_sazzad's user avatar
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What is the relationship between an electron's wave-like and particle-like qualities? Is "Electrons are waves and particles" the whole truth?

This confusion stems from old and incomplete versions of quantum mechanics. The present-day theory that nature is described by local quantum fields simply holds that electrons are described by such a ...
Jos Bergervoet's user avatar
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What is the relationship between an electron's wave-like and particle-like qualities? Is "Electrons are waves and particles" the whole truth?

There's no occult "truth". There are, however, reproducible and predictable experiments. Experiments sensitive to wave-like properties observe waves, while experiments sensitive to particle-...
John Doty's user avatar
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How exactly classical electrodynamics fails to explain the Compton effect?

In classical EM theory, the scattered radiation has the same frequency as the primary wave when the electron oscillates around a central point in space that is at rest. Frequency of the scattered ...
Ján Lalinský's user avatar
1 vote

How do charged particles accelerate away from an oppositely charged substance? Like in a cathode gun or gridded ion thruster

The answer is found by looking at the rate of change of potential, potential gradient, whose magnitude is equal to the electric field which in turn controls the acceleration of charged particles. Here ...
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Electric current density definition

I'm just wondering why the current density $J$ is always defined as the amount of electric current traveling per unit cross-section area $J = \frac{I}{S}$, and not per volume unit $J = \frac{I}{V}$ so ...
hft's user avatar
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2 votes

Electric current density definition

Wouldn't it be useful to calculate electric current density per volume? No. That quantity would have very little use in physics because it is not physically meaningful. The reason why we define ...
naturallyInconsistent's user avatar
2 votes

Does the proton do anything in a simple electric DC circuit?

You are correct that electrons are the majority charge carriers in metallic conductors, which make up most of the current path in a typical electric circuit. But not all conductors are metallic. In ...
rob's user avatar
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Electric fields created by electrons

In the days when I did this sort of calculation we normally worked with the potential and if we needed the field we'd get it by differentiating the potential. The advantage of using a potential is ...
John Rennie's user avatar
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Electric fields created by electrons

The total charge density of proton ($p$) and electron ($e^-$) is given by $$ \rho(\vec{x})= \rho_{ p}(\vec{x})+\rho_{e^-}(\vec{x}),$$ with $$\begin{align}\rho_p(\vec{x})= e\, \delta^{(3)}(\vec{x}) \...
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If an electron is an elementary particle, where is charge "stored"?

if a particle has no internal structure, where can the difference between the electron and its antiparticle exist? Your premise does not seem correct: a physical electron does have internal structure,...
akhmeteli's user avatar
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Can two electrons co-moving in a vacuum form a combined pair if the magnetic field is stronger than the electric field?

Two co-moving electrons exert a repulsive electric force and an attractive magnetic force. So it would seem that at some great speed the attractive magnetic force should be equal to the repulsive ...
Dale's user avatar
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1 vote

If an electron is an elementary particle, where is charge "stored"?

The full information about all properties of (free) electrons and positrons is "stored" in the (quantum) field operator $$\psi(x) =\sum\limits_s \int d\mu(p) \left[ b(p,s) u(p,s) e^{-ip\cdot ...
Hyperon's user avatar
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If an electron is an elementary particle, where is charge "stored"?

I dont think that information have size.When we say that e.g a latch stores a bit we are refering to the output voltage level.How does the latch store the voltage level?The transistors inside the gate ...
Root Groves's user avatar
5 votes
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Are QED Feynman diagrams readable in any order?

Cooking recipe: Diagram (a): Start with the outgoing electron (i.e. the electron in the final state with momentum $p^\prime$): $\, \bar{u}(p^\prime)$ Following the electron line backwards (i.e. ...
Hyperon's user avatar
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How come two electrons interfere?

Interference or diffraction are effects of the interaction of the particle with the field they pass through (see Casimer effect) and which is found in the holes, what we see on the screen: diffraction ...
The Tiler's user avatar
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2 votes

How come two electrons interfere?

Electrons do not interfere with themselves nor with each other. It is the wave function that exhibits interference effects. For a successful demonstration of electron interference a low enough bundle ...
my2cts's user avatar
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3 votes

How come two electrons interfere?

Electrons would repel each other. If they overlap, they might not for very long. Electrons can overlap. They do so in an He atom. Both electrons occupy the lowest energy orbital. Being Fermions, they ...
mmesser314's user avatar
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3 votes

How come two electrons interfere?

Electrons are just quanta of the electron field. To say there is one electron in an experiment means more or less the same as to say the number operator of that field has negligible probability to ...
alanf's user avatar
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-2 votes

How come two electrons interfere?

The reason why the electron double slit works the same way as the photon double slit and the neutron double slit and the helium atom double slit is because all of these are measurements on ...
FlatterMann's user avatar
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11 votes

How come two electrons interfere?

In the double slit experiments, you never have two different electrons interacting. It is always the wavefunction of a single electron interfering with itself. You should not confuse the electron (...
Léo Vacher's user avatar

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