Skip to main content

New answers tagged

0 votes

Why does classical physics not predict particles in the double-slit experiment to land in just two different locations?

It's completely normal to be puzzled by this and to follow the heuristics behind the development can help understanding how all the concepts you mention fit together. Let me start with the ...
Rimelius's user avatar
  • 188
4 votes

Why does classical physics not predict particles in the double-slit experiment to land in just two different locations?

Why does classical physics not predict particles in the double-slit experiment to land in just two different locations? It does. If it’s a particle. Classical physics predicts that if you are firing ...
Dale M's user avatar
  • 337
2 votes

Why does classical physics not predict particles in the double-slit experiment to land in just two different locations?

A very common misunderstanding of the quantum double-slit experiment is that if you arrange for each particle to go through one slit (e.g. by putting a detector at one or both slits) then you will get ...
benrg's user avatar
  • 26.9k
2 votes

Why does classical physics not predict particles in the double-slit experiment to land in just two different locations?

This is indeed one of the experiments that led to the development of quantum mechanics. The depiction of the video is misleading as electrons simply cannot be pictured as point particles "moving&...
Vincent Thacker's user avatar
4 votes

Why does classical physics not predict particles in the double-slit experiment to land in just two different locations?

It is often said that particles are sometimes particles and sometimes waves. This is one source of confusion. They are sort of like particles and sort of like waves. They are really like nothing ...
mmesser314's user avatar
  • 39.5k
7 votes

Why does classical physics not predict particles in the double-slit experiment to land in just two different locations?

You need to look first at the case with only one slit. There you will find that not just one spot is illuminated (straight behind the slit) but that you get diffraction [Fraunhofer diffraction ...
Jos Bergervoet's user avatar
3 votes

Why does classical physics not predict particles in the double-slit experiment to land in just two different locations?

The entire experiment can be performed with molecules of buckminsterfullerene. I was also very surprised when I found out even such large molecules where presenting quantum effects and could be ...
Chris Ze Third's user avatar
3 votes

Why does classical physics not predict particles in the double-slit experiment to land in just two different locations?

But this is not about light. You can say that. But our experiments show that for certain setups we cannot ignore the wavelike behavior of small masses, exactly the same as we can't ignore the ...
BowlOfRed's user avatar
  • 40.3k
3 votes

Regge Theory interpretation

I think you have $t$ and $s$ mixed up. For s-channel elastic scattering of two equal mass particles $$ \cos \theta =1+\frac{t}{2|{\bf P}|^2}= 1+\frac{t}{s-4m^2} $$ with $0>t> - 4|{\bf P}|^2$. ...
mike stone's user avatar
  • 53.8k
1 vote
Accepted

Rutherford scattering closest approach distance

Go through this sequence. Find the velocity of the centre of mass. Find the velocity of the two particles in the Com frame. Find the sum of the kinetic energies of the two particles in the CoM frame. ...
Farcher's user avatar
  • 96.8k
2 votes
Accepted

Complex BCFW-shift of Parke-Taylor amplitude

The BCFW recursion relation is mainly used to recursively build connected $n$-point tree-amplitudes. The point of Exercise 3.3 in Ref. 1 is to check that the residue theorem works on the Riemann ...
Qmechanic's user avatar
  • 204k
1 vote
Accepted

Reflection of quantum particle colliding with a potential barrier

Your last statement is basically correct. For a single particle, the current $\vec{J}$ is measuring a current of probability density $|\psi|^2$. However, to physically interpret what such a ...
Andrew's user avatar
  • 49.6k
0 votes

Are reflection and transmission coefficients in 1D problem are independent of the direction in which we choose as incident?

In general the reflection and transmission coefficients are not independent of direction for arbitrary potentials. For a discussion of the conditions under which the transmission coefficient is ...
alanf's user avatar
  • 8,056
1 vote

Are reflection and transmission coefficients in 1D problem are independent of the direction in which we choose as incident?

You are right. There is some symmetry, but only enough to relate $T$ and $T'$, not to get $R=R'$. You can even find this as a classical result: (for light or EM waves, or electrical signals) https://...
Jos Bergervoet's user avatar
0 votes

What makes diffraction spikes move with the focus?

The diffraction spikes are image and object independent and the mask which is divided into thirds (like a pie cut in 3 pieces) divides the rays into say an upper third and a bottom right and left ...
PhysicsDave's user avatar
  • 2,633
0 votes

What makes diffraction spikes move with the focus?

The imaging happens as follows: The star imaged is very far away, so it reaches the telescope nearly as a plane wave. Depending on the position of the star in the image field, the wavefronts are ...
Pidrittel's user avatar

Top 50 recent answers are included