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I found solid-solid transformation on Wikipedia Please tell me what it is? It's present in types of phase transition in Wikipedia.

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  • $\begingroup$ Ice has a dozen different states, my guess is that it refers to something like that $\endgroup$ Jan 21 '14 at 11:34
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It's common for crystalline solids to have a range of different crystal structures depending on temperature and pressure. For example pure iron has three different crystal structures and once you start alloying it you can get many other crystal structures.

So if you take $\alpha$-iron at room temperature and heat it to above 912C it will transform to the $\gamma$-iron structure. The conversion between the $\alpha$ and $\gamma$ structures is a first order phase transition (known as the austentitic transition) and it occurs in the solid state. Hence it is an example of a solid state phase transition.

There are innumerable other examples of similar phase transitions in solids. They occur because the atoms in solids are not locked in place but can move, though obviously the rate of movement is extremely slow compared to liquids and gases.

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  • $\begingroup$ Allotropic transitions of C and P more common examples.. $\endgroup$
    – Zenix
    Apr 8 '20 at 22:56

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