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Concise Physics mentions that:

Higher the concentration of the electrolyte greater is the internal resistance(in a cell).

I think that higher the concentration of the electrolyte higher would be the number of ions present and therefore greater would be the conductance of the electrolyte leading to lower resistance.But the book mentions the opposite. So my question is how does higher concentration leads to higher internal resistance in the cell? OR Is it wrongly given in the book?

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  • $\begingroup$ The book is in all likelihood incorrect. It happens. $\endgroup$
    – Gert
    Dec 27, 2021 at 23:49
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    $\begingroup$ Please provide more information. What kind of battery are we talking about? What kind of electrolyte? What is the concentration? Is it diluted with water? $\endgroup$
    – joseph h
    Dec 28, 2021 at 0:46

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My first guess would be that the book may be mistaken. I personally carried out an experiment where I used different concentrations of HCl as an electrolyte and saw how the internal resistance changes accordingly. Turns out that there is a negative correlation between the two variables, where the higher the concentration of the electrolyte (in my case the acid), the lower the internal resistance. This was because of the larger number of conducting ions in the acid causing an increase in current and therefore a decrease in internal resistance.

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