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enter image description here

In the above picture, when we connect the positive side or negative side of the sphere to ground, electrons go to ground.

Why isn't there any difference between the situations when the negative side is connected and when the positive side is connected to the ground?

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  • $\begingroup$ If you ground with a wire the sphere that has previously been negatively charged by induction to the positive ground terminal, the electrons flow in the opposite direction. Hence through any and all ground connections from the positive terminal. $\endgroup$ – Sebastiano Jul 18 '19 at 9:04
  • $\begingroup$ sphere is neutral. I want to charge sphere with induction. my question is : $\endgroup$ – user3728644 Jul 18 '19 at 11:37
  • $\begingroup$ why when connect positive side of sphere to ground, electrons go from sphere to ground? $\endgroup$ – user3728644 Jul 18 '19 at 11:38
  • $\begingroup$ Then I apologize for not understanding the question. The direction of the current, assuming that there is current, or flow of electrons in the unit of time, is by convention the positive one, i.e. the protons that move from the positive to the negative pole. The real direction is the opposite, i.e. it is the electrons that move and not the protons. $\endgroup$ – Sebastiano Jul 18 '19 at 11:49
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    $\begingroup$ excuse me for repeat. I tell why no different between negative side to ground with positive side to ground? in two cases electron go to ground. $\endgroup$ – user3728644 Jul 18 '19 at 12:24
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I think a negative rod likes to repel electrons on the right side of the sphere. Therefore the right side is positive and left side negative. Now when connecting the positive side to the ground... it is created large space rod to repel extra electron to the ground.

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    $\begingroup$ I remind you that the right side has positive charges but there are always negative charges on the right side (there is a predominance of negative charges). Basically, your reasoning is correct. $\endgroup$ – Sebastiano Jul 18 '19 at 18:50
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The direction of electrons flow should be opposite to each other, in the diagrams shown in the question. The earth has zero potential. Electrons flow from lower potential to higher potential and positive charges flow in conventional current direction, i.e. from higher potential to lower potential.

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