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When reading about the basics of photography and the physics involved, I learned about  depth of field. Long story short, the message is that with a smaller aperture, the length of the depth of field increases. For a wide-open aperture one gets a smooth bokeh for example.

The human eye does have an aperture as well (the iris). But I never noticed seeing any different with respect to depth of field no matter if it was a darker (wider iris) or brighter (narrow iris) environment.

Why is this difference presumably not as pronounced as it is for photography? Or am I mistaken?

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Because your eyes are young, you will not experience a difference.

However, once you age, depth of field makes a BIG difference, because your eye gradually loses the ability to shift the focus of the lens. To see close objects sharply then requires bright illumination so your iris contracts to a small opening and your depth of focus goes up; this compensates for the loss of ability to focus on close objects.

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With increasing age power of accomodation to vary iris diameter diminishes. So to compensate for focussing inability (contraction of tiny sphincter like muscles in the iris that work like the diaphragm in a camera) brighter objects are used/needed by the old. You seem to be young with no such problem.

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