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81 votes
Accepted

Error concerning projectile motion in respected textbook?

I agree that the statement I made in the book is wrong: On a flat earth the time of flight is not affected by the initial horizontal velocity, only the horizontal distance is. I will post a correction ...
R Shankar's user avatar
  • 656
4 votes

Error concerning projectile motion in respected textbook?

As @RatulThakur points out, this is pretty clearly an error. ToF is not affected at all by horizontal velocity on a flat Earth, unless you're considering the aerodynamics of the object (there's a ...
controlgroup's user avatar
2 votes

For an objective falling, reaching terminal velocity and then hitting the ground, how can I find the force it exerts on the ground?

Short answer: The given information is not enough. Long answer: You correctly noted that the force of the impact is related to the change in momentum. We take off from there. If we assume the duration ...
Saeed's user avatar
  • 216
2 votes

When an object is thrown towards the sky it starts to gain potential energy, why?

The object has energy, whether it is kinetic or potential. There is a point in its trajectory where the object is not moving, and this is at the highest point of its trajectory. At this point, it has ...
ABetheGammow's user avatar
2 votes

Issue with simplifying the equation related to non-uniform acceleration

The equation $$ \frac {d v}{dt}= A+ B\, v^2 $$ with constant $A$ and $B$ is an example of a Riccati equation. The Wikipedi article shows you how to solve it.
mike stone's user avatar
  • 54.4k
1 vote

When an object is thrown towards the sky it starts to gain potential energy, why?

There are two ways to view the exchange of kinetic energy and potential energy. But before I do, I'd like to point out that your learning of physics will be much much easier if you drop the concept ...
Cort Ammon's user avatar
  • 50.3k
1 vote

Different results of Range of a projectile

This is a really weird question... You're talking about two entirely separate things. Usually when we refer to range, we mean the linear distance covered between point of takeoff and point of landing. ...
Ekarshi's user avatar
  • 63
1 vote

Different results of Range of a projectile

Your range equation assumes that the projectile stops at the same height it is launched at. If the launch angle is $0^\circ$, then it does not have an initial upward velocity component, and hence it ...
BioPhysicist's user avatar
  • 57.2k

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