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6 votes

Does this prove that the force and momentum formulas are wrong?

Assuming that OP means Newton's second law by force formula, Note that it says $$\mathbf{F}_\text{net}=m\mathbf{a}_\text{net}$$ In you situation, you are putting two forces from opposite sizes so that ...
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3 votes

Does this prove that the force and momentum formulas are wrong?

Force does not require speed (or momentum). That is a common misconception. In your scenario, you have a stationary object, so Newton's 1st law applies: $$\sum F=0\quad \Leftrightarrow \quad F_\text{...
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3 votes
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Would it be correct to state that the damping force and the spring force are equal in the case of critical damping?

Would it be correct to state that the damping force and the spring force are equal in the case of critical damping? No. Regardless of whether a damped harmonic oscillator is underdamped, critically ...
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1 vote

Which tube experiences a larger buoyant force?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buoyancy From the first paragraph: "[The buoyancy force]... is equivalent to the weight of the fluid that would otherwise occupy the submerged volume of the object, ...
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1 vote

Does this prove that the force and momentum formulas are wrong?

When you say that force and momentum formulas are based on motion, that is not completely true. For example, Hooke's law says that the degree to which a spring is stretched or compressed is ...
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1 vote

Would water flow in the following system?

Short answer: it depends! Longer answer: If the temperature of the water in the tank is uniform and the peltier is able to reduce the temperature of the water, ther will be a flow of water. At least ...
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  • 380
1 vote

Why does Newton's second law involve mass?

Newton's second law states that the force experienced by a body is vectorially equal to the rate of change of its momentum which is defined as mv. For a fixed mass, this rate reduces to the familiar ...
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1 vote

Why is angular momentum equal to mass times radius times velocity?

When momentum is mass times velocity, why is angular momentum mass times radius times velocity? High-school summary We are interested in both angular momentum and linear momentum because they are ...
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