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I have completely understood the time dilation topic along with its mathematical derivation and consequences. And we know due to time dilation a person's biological clock slows down.So I am not getting that point how slowing down of time in physical clocks affects the slowing down of our biological clock. I don't think that rate of metabolism inside our body is dependent on frame of reference.Please explain this.Are there any kind of biological explanation to this?

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  • $\begingroup$ The explanation is not biological. It is purely physical. The biology merely overlays on top of the physical behaviors. Of course, no living creature has ever moved at a speed sufficiently high with respect to another to cause a measurable change in metabolism as measured from the ground. The effects of time dialation are lost in the noise compared to the other sources of variability in metabolism. We talk of Mark and Scott Kelley(twins) getting older or younger with respect to each other when one is orbiting in space, but practically it is not measurable. $\endgroup$ – Cort Ammon Jul 26 '19 at 6:50
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Your body is essentially a clock, ticking at the rate at which you age. Regardless of what reference frame you are in, you always find yourself to be aging at the same rate, so your "biological clock" does not slow down at all. This is your "proper" rate of aging. If however you are in motion with respect to some other observer, the observer will see you aging more slowly than the "proper" rate. So your "biological clock" will appear to have slowed down relative to this observer, and it is in this sense that your "rate of metabolism" depends on the observer.

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    $\begingroup$ Good answer. When it comes to (special) relativity, most of the misconceptions come from the fact that people tend to omit saying "according to your frame of reference" or "according to other frame of reference". An observer will not see or experience anything different in his/her own frame regardless of how fast he/she is going. It is always about what an observer will see and think about other observers in other frames of reference. $\endgroup$ – AWanderingMind Jul 26 '19 at 11:55

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