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This question already has an answer here:

Where is earth in relation to the center of the Universe? If we point a telescope in any given direction will we come up with the same distance to "as far as we can see"? Or can we see farther in some direction(s) as opposed to others. If the universe is indeed expanding then we should be traveling further from one part than another, unless we are indeed in the center, thus every part would be moving away from us in a more or less uniform manner.

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marked as duplicate by John Rennie, peterh, ACuriousMind, user36790, Jon Custer Sep 8 '16 at 19:31

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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Our universe to a very high degree is assumed to be isotropic and spatially homogeneous, and hence, has a six dimensional isometry group for 3 spatial rotations and 3 spatial translations. Hence, the universe in cosmological terms is considered "typical" and represented by the FLRW metric (cosmologists would say perturbed-FLRW, but this is slightly more of a technical issue). Anyways, because of these isometries, the universe is taken to be the same at every spatial point, and hence has no "center".

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The Universe has no known center.

Even if it would have, it would be irrelevant if we are in the center or not, if it expands everywhere with the same rate.

With telescopes we can see light, and the Universe is 13.7 billion years old. Thus, we can see 13.7 billion years away. They are currently around 46 billion light years away, because the Universe meanwhile expanded a little bit.

Check this question.

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    $\begingroup$ "the Universe meanwhile expanded a little bit" is good, since the "little bit" is around a factor of 1000 (the CMB redshift) [: $\endgroup$ – Yukterez Sep 8 '16 at 17:53
  • $\begingroup$ @СимонТыран Hehh, thanks :-) I am happy that you understood the irony :-) $\endgroup$ – peterh Sep 12 '16 at 16:04

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