Linked Questions

6
votes
3answers
2k views

Textbook on Differential Geometry for General Relativity [duplicate]

I'm going to start self-studying General Relativity from Sean Caroll's Spacetime and Geometry: An Introduction to General Relativity. I'd like to have a textbook on Differential Geometry/Calculus on ...
2
votes
1answer
328 views

Connection and curvature using differential forms [duplicate]

I am trying to understand how one would use differential forms to calculate the components of the connection and the curvature tensor given a metric. Can anyone point me to relevant resources for the ...
1
vote
0answers
123 views

Is there a book that discusses General Relativity in terms of Modern Differential Geometry? [duplicate]

All of the physics books that I've seen which discuss General Relativity do so in terms of coordinates - the tensor calculus - even though the naturally relevant entities are invariant under general ...
0
votes
0answers
110 views

Literature request for books / review papers on gravitation, gauge theories and related mathematics [duplicate]

Similar to this reference, are there more such references / works [including textbooks] available in the literature? (A list would be greatly welcomed and appreciated.)
1
vote
0answers
71 views

Very specific type of GR paper hunt [duplicate]

My General relativity skills suck. I need a good paper that does not start with equivalence principle and pages of elevator experiments derives principles mathematically, not by physical intuition ...
314
votes
1answer
73k views

Book recommendations [closed]

Every once in a while, we get a question asking for a book or other educational reference on a particular topic at a particular level. This is a meta-question that collects all those links together. ...
44
votes
8answers
9k views

Classical mechanics without coordinates book

I am a graduate student in mathematics who would like to learn some classical mechanics. However, there is one caveat: I am not interested in the standard coordinate approach. I can't help but think ...
6
votes
4answers
3k views

General relativity in terms of differential forms

Is there a formulation of general relativity in terms of differential forms instead of tensors with indexs and subindexs? If yes, where can I find it and what are the advantages of each method? If not,...
14
votes
3answers
3k views

Books on cosmology

I have finished Carroll's general relativity book, Spacetime and Geometry. I am specifically interested in cosmology, so is there any book which goes more in depth into cosmology? I prefer a ...
6
votes
3answers
2k views

Where do I start with Non-Euclidean Geometry?

I've been trying to grok General Relativity for a while now, and I've been having some trouble. Many physics textbooks gloss over the subject with an "it's too advanced for this medium", and many ...
7
votes
2answers
667 views

Why isn't invariant notation common?

In principle, one can write quantities in a manifestly invariant - rather than covariant - fashion in e.g. special relativity. For example, rather than writing just $x^\mu$, we could write the basis ...
0
votes
2answers
548 views

How much physics a mathematician needs to know to study GR? [duplicate]

I'm intending to study General Relativity on my own. The thing is, my physics background is not very strong. I know classical mechanics and I know some electromagnetism. I'm familiar with Gauss' law, ...
1
vote
1answer
454 views

Mathematical description in GR

I have heard a phrase somewhere, which can be reduced to the following two points: 1) There exists a handy and underused mathematical apparatus applicable to GR, comparing to which tensor calculus is ...
1
vote
3answers
204 views

Technical question about 2-forms

A technical question about the electromagnetic tensor, but before that, it is know if, say, instead of being $$F_{\mu\nu}=\partial_{\mu}A_{\nu} - \partial_{\nu}A_{\mu}$$it were $$F_{\mu\nu}=(...)_{\mu\...