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My search for a book with extremely hard physics problems(conceptual or a problem to solve) had led me to a couple books like "Pathfinder for Olympiad and JEE (Advanced) Physics", "I.E Irodov", "S.S Krotov" and the "200 Puzzling Problems in Physics" series over the past couple months and other books that I had seen on the internet doesn't have more difficult problems.

Are there any books/resources which you have seen which has even harder problems?

I am currently specifically looking for problems related to mechanics (Kinematics, Rotational Dynamics, etc).

A hard problem is a defined such that it uses a unique hard to grasp logic that you would have to think a lot in order to solve and is not a question which requires you to solve a exorbitant amount of equations or calculate very complicated derivatives or integrals.

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Exploring Classical Mechanics by Kotkin and Serbo (Oxford University Press) is a collection of 350 fairly advanced problems, with solutions. It deals with classic material, such as fixed point analysis, small oscillations, scattering and includes problems in Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics.

An alternative is

Classical Mechanics Illustrated by Modern Physics by David Guéry-Odelin and Thierry Lahaye (Imperial College Press) which contains longer problems than Kotkin, but is not as expansive.

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All the books below are for conceptual understanding as it seems you already have enough question Bank. You can also refer to the following books:

  1. Classical mechanics by Goldstein: This book is for conceptual understanding of classical mechanics mainly Lagrangian.
  2. HC Verma Concepts of Physics: This books is a common recommendation in India for aspirants of JEE.
  3. Lastly, our all time favourite, the Feynman's Lectures on Physics.
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  • $\begingroup$ I don't understand why there is a down vote in a question of recommendation. $\endgroup$ Commented Mar 10 at 12:35

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