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I have a (probably very) basic understanding of electricity, how/why current flows, etc. from my ham technician's license. I often think of the water-in-a-hose analogy, how pressure (voltage?) causes water to flow (current?). However, I'm confused on what actually flows in a wire. I'm pretty sure that the current flowing is actually only electrons "jumping" across atoms continuously through the wire (in a DC circuit, anyways). Here's where my confusion is.

In the diagram below, it shows that when a magnet is placed near a basic Hall Effect sensor, it causes protons and electrons to separate across the diagonal axis to the current flowing, creating a voltage. However, I've also heard that protons don't actually move. Am I correct in assuming that the electrons are indeed "pushed"/"pulled" to the side, but the showing the protons is just a simplified way of showing that there is an imbalance of the proton-to-electron ratio, creating a "void" of the lack of electrons, and it is this that causes the voltage?

enter image description here

Sorry if this isn't worded well, feel free to ask for clarification.

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  • $\begingroup$ Please include the diagram in your question post. $\endgroup$
    – The Photon
    Jan 8, 2021 at 19:55
  • $\begingroup$ Oops, i forgot to do that. Thanks. $\endgroup$
    – Galaxy
    Jan 8, 2021 at 19:57

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Yes, you got it exactly right! If en electron from one side moves to the other side, it leaves behind a positive "hole" and this is where the positive charge there comes from.

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