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Let's consider a conductor which has a potential difference across its ends.

And let's say that the electrons which already have tendency to move inside the conductor, by all of a sudden if positive charges (not protons because we cannot isolate them, the work of the positive charge will do the kernal of that atom with which the material is made up of) also gets tendency to move inside the conductor then what will happen exactly?

Can this the thought as the current will become double as compared to current that actually flows in our normal life? as we can think it as in the place of movement of electrons we can say positive charges are moving in the opposite direction? So this will become like, the positive charges were already moving in that direction and now we visualized that instead of thinking the electrons are flowing, in the opposite direction the positive charges are moving in the same direction as those positive charges which we were talking about before who got ability to move inside the conductor? And that's how current will become double. Am I thinking right?

What's the exact scenario that's going to happen here?

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    $\begingroup$ Where are your positive charges coming from? $\endgroup$ Commented Jan 11, 2022 at 12:55
  • $\begingroup$ I'm talking about those positive charges which are already present due to the existing free electrons in order to make the material electrically neutral. If they also got mobility then what will happen that's the question. $\endgroup$ Commented Jan 11, 2022 at 12:59
  • $\begingroup$ Oh by "not protons" you meant "not isolated protons"? You're assuming the nuclei of the atoms will be moving independently of the electrons then? $\endgroup$ Commented Jan 11, 2022 at 13:16
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    $\begingroup$ Wait hold on. Holes are different than nuclei. And you don't get double current from holes moving, since in reality it's just electrons moving the other way. You have given two different conflicting clarifications. $\endgroup$ Commented Jan 11, 2022 at 13:29
  • $\begingroup$ @BioPhysicist I was just thinking that If those vacancies started to move then what will happen I just put down everything whatever was going inside my mind but now I'm at the conclusion that I was thinking wrong. Thanks for this, it's made only possible because of you. $\endgroup$ Commented Jan 11, 2022 at 13:46

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The sort of situation you're thinking about is basically what happens in an saline solution. Both the positive and negative ions can migrate in response to an applied electric field, and the total current is the sum of the current due to the negative ions and the current due to the positive ions. To calculate the overall conductivity of the solution, you would need to take the properties of both positive and negative ions into account (their electrical mobility as well as their concentration in the solution.)

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  • $\begingroup$ So can we say here that the current will become double as I'm thinking of? Not exactly double but approximately near to it and because the ions are freely moving in the saline solution its permitivity will also get affected and will be increased which will lead to the decrement in field and force as well. $\endgroup$ Commented Jan 12, 2022 at 4:20
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    $\begingroup$ @TejasDahake: "Approximately double" is probably a bit too strong, since the positive and negative ions generally don't have the same mobility or even the same density (e.g. a solution of sulfuric acid, $\mathrm{ H_2 SO_4}$, will have two hydrogen ions for every sulfate ion.) I would just say that the current will consist of two components that both have to be taken into account. $\endgroup$ Commented Jan 12, 2022 at 13:09
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If there were free positive charges (with properties similar to the free electrons) in addition to the free electrons, then then the resistance would be lower and the Hall effect voltages would be lower (or reversed).

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