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I'm trying to magnetize various objects, such that they take on a strong magnetic field.

Theoretically, magnetism is caused by aligning electrons such that they stay more or less in the same place.

If i heat the electrons, they're more energetic, and thus likely won't be in the same place. But could i theoretically use the same system that an Air Conditioning unit uses ( compressed air can more readily exchange heat than uncompressed air ), by aligning the electrons when they're more energetic, and cooling them down while still aligning them, could that create a stronger magnet than just aligning them while cold?

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By aligning magnetic domains (ie. electron spins) you can create a very strong magnet in, for example, a ferrite. You can heat up iron for example to a specific temperature at which spins become less localized (ie. more mobile) and subject it to a very strong magnetic field that is created externally by say an electromagnet. The spins will align with said field and if you cool the iron down while maintaining the external applied field the spins will "lock in place" and remain aligned.

After some time though usually magnetization can fade due to various factors and the magnet can typically be "re-initialized" by repeating the previous process.

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  • $\begingroup$ But is the magnetization stronger without the heat? $\endgroup$ – tuskiomi Aug 29 '17 at 23:50
  • $\begingroup$ I wouldn't see why. The aligning of spins is what drives up the strength of the field, so I don't see how they would be stronger if they were aligned without applying heat first (irrespective of the fact that that would be very difficult, if not impossible to accomplish) $\endgroup$ – eisi0523 Aug 30 '17 at 0:13
  • $\begingroup$ Also be careful when using the word magnetization. The magnetization of a material is a nonlinear effect caused by magnetostriction of particles within the medium $\endgroup$ – eisi0523 Aug 30 '17 at 0:15

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