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Why do most theories about what Dark energy and Dark matter is make it so that these substances (or not) need to be some kind of undiscovered particle? Would it be possible for Dark energy to simply be another force acting in another dimension that also affects us by warping our dimension too? Would it be possible for dark matter to be the same, a force that is in another dimension that also affects the dimension we inhabit, spacetime?

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closed as off-topic by DilithiumMatrix, AccidentalFourierTransform, Kyle Oman, CuriousOne, ACuriousMind May 9 '16 at 9:59

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  • $\begingroup$ What other dimension? In the dimensions that actually exist, spacetime is warped by matter and energy. That's why we theorize dark matter to be matter. $\endgroup$ – Asher May 9 '16 at 5:27
  • $\begingroup$ Possible duplicates : Are modified theories of gravity credible? physics.stackexchange.com/q/6561 , Theory that gets rid of dark matter/energy, physics.stackexchange.com/q/29459, Dark matter and dark energy, physics.stackexchange.com/q/47779, Could M-Theory explain dark matter as well as dark energy?, physics.stackexchange.com/q/184459 $\endgroup$ – sammy gerbil May 9 '16 at 6:19
  • $\begingroup$ Answers are likely to be opinion-based : "Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise." $\endgroup$ – sammy gerbil May 9 '16 at 6:24
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Welcome here. From your profile I see that you are at the beginning stages of learning physics. This is an arduous process that needs a lot of elbow grease in solving problems and/or doing experiments in order to get a basic intuition for the subject.

Here is a simplified answer to your questions:

Why do most theories about what Dark energy and Dark matter is make it so that these substances (or not) need to be some kind of undiscovered particle?

Dark energy is an input needed from astrophysical observations, which show an accelerating expansion of the universe. I know of no theory that proposes new particles to explain this. They all use the General Relativity equations to address the problem

Would it be possible for Dark energy to simply be another force acting in another dimension that also affects us by warping our dimension too?

At the level of General relativity which describes gravitation, there are no forces, just space functions dependent on the General Relativity equations. Dark energy is modeled within GR by attibuting its effect to the cosmological constant of the equations.

from the wiki link:

Adding the cosmological constant to cosmology's standard FLRW metric leads to the Lambda-CDM model, which has been referred to as the "standard model of cosmology" because of its precise agreement with observations.

You further ask:

Would it be possible for dark matter to be the same, a force that is in another dimension that also affects the dimension we inhabit, spacetime?

Dark matter is called dark because it emits no light that can be seen in astronomical observations, but the orbits of the galaxies need extra matter to the observed luminous matter in order to be modeled correctly.

That is the reason one searches for "dark particles" in elementary particle interactions, i.e. ones that do not emit light, electromagnetic radiation.

There exist alternative models for dark matter, which cannot be tested in the lab, but might be validated by observations sometime. As "mass in extra dimensions", or "topological defects" or even "modified gravity".

The paragraph of " mass in extra dimensions" refers to what you are proposing, as the gravitational force is the only force coming from that mass to our dimensions. So yes, it is a model, and models need validation from experiments and theory, which is all what doing physics and astrophysics research is about.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thank you for your answer as I am quite a newcomer to the field of physics. $\endgroup$ – Physics_learner May 9 '16 at 23:30

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