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Say, for instance, I am outside standing 20 feet away from a speaker. Is there an object I can put on my body that would allow me to feel the bass of the music more, without picking up the vibrations from the ground? I know sound waves are redirected if they hit an object, but is there anything that can pull them? Magnets or anything? I don't think there is, because wouldn't that mean that somebody listening to the speaker around me would then hear the sound less if I am "hogging" the waves? Thanks for anything helpful guys

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There is a way that bass can be improved by positioning oneself in the "sweet spot" where standing waves create a maxima. This article has a lot more info on various techniques

This article focuses on dealing with standing waves to improve bass problems for small room acoustics. The best way both aesthetically and efficiency to solve bass problems is through modal manipulation using multiple subwoofers. Once you reduce the seat-seat variance at bass frequencies, any remaining peaks can be EQ'ed out of the response to eliminate room resonances. Low frequency bass traps can be used to supplement this solution if they are deemed to be necessary and practical.

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Is there an object I can put on my body that would allow me to feel the bass of the music more, without picking up the vibrations from the ground?

Anything rigid and lightweight will convert the sound pressure more effectively into force. That's why loudspeakers have cones.

I know sound waves are redirected if they hit an object, but is there anything that can pull them? Magnets or anything? I don't think there is, because wouldn't that mean that somebody listening to the speaker around me would then hear the sound less if I am "hogging" the waves?

All objects will diffract the waves. It is customary to speak of reflection when the diffractor is considerably larger than the wavelength. A diffractor will also cast a shadow. This is basic wave physics. The effects of diffraction are greatest behind the diffractor when viewed from the source but it depends on the exact circumstances such as frequency and positioning of sources and observers.

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Wave propagation is governed by wave equations which only needs the local characteristics of the propagation medium. This is partly explained by Huygen's Law. If you can control the local properties of the medium then waves could prefer some directions which you would observe higher amplitudes. This is how antennas work. So in short, wave amplitudes can vary spatially. You can use acoustical "antennas" to direct sound waves towards you.

Back to your question; you would like to pull the waves to you ear... 1) so that you can have larger amplitudes than expected. The answer is you cannot pull waves. You must change the propagating medium to do that. 2) so that you can have stronger bass (low pass signal). This could be possible only if you can filter out the high frequencies. Placing a marble plate in between or some other measure might work to attenuate the higher frequencies, increasing bass only relative to higher frequencies. But pulling sound waves, and amplifying absolute level of bass, not possible. Sorry.

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