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I was thinking if you could use a laser of a specific frequency to write a hologram on a film, and then to try to record over the same film but with a laser of another frequency the the first. Is it possible for two holograms to be on the same holographic film?

(So much that you can read an image or another depending on the frequency of the laser you use.)

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  • $\begingroup$ Yes, as long as the holographic material is in its linear exposure range. If the second hologram saturates regions of the film, then the information about the first one is lost, too. I don't have time to expand on this in detail, otherwise I would make this into a longer answer. $\endgroup$ – CuriousOne Oct 21 '14 at 22:47
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From MIT Museum Collections: Mini Kiss II

This hologram was made in 1975 of a person blowing a kiss and is made from multiple exposures (at least 16) on the film so that it appears the person is moving.

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