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I am looking for a possibly extensive list of great textbooks on elastic and inelastic scattering of particles within quantum field theory. So far I am familiar with:

  • Peskin and Schroeder: An introduction to quantum field theory
  • Taylor: Scattering Theory: The Quantum Theory of Nonrelativistic Collisions
  • Kukulin: Theory of resonances
  • Messiah: Quantum Mechanics
  • Landau and Lifshitz vols 2-4

However I wish to read more on this subject, but only found some way to general general textbooks (as for exmple Peskin and Schroeder).

Any help would be greatly appreciated :)

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Take a look at Collision theory by Goldberger&Watson (1964). Its an old classic book covering variety of topics in scattering theory within relativistic QM and QFT.

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  • $\begingroup$ I've been reading it and i think i like it. Thanks. Hoping some more suggestion dribble in over time though :) $\endgroup$
    – liskawc
    Oct 3 '14 at 8:06
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It is not clear if you are looking for textbooks specifically dedicated to scattering in QFT (the title says so, but then you make reference to Peskin which is not), so going for good expositions inside more generally broaded textbooks:

Chapter 17 of Robert D. Klauber, Student Friendly Quantum Field Theory (also see here): Aside for a summary of classical/quantum non-relativistic/relativistic scattering theory, contains a lot of useful summary tables of the results and completely works out the calculations for the cross sections of $e^-e^+ \rightarrow l^- l^+$, Bhabha scattering, Compton Scattering (in a lot of details).

Chapter 8 (on the 1st edition, don't know about the second one) of Mandl-Shaw, Quantum Field Theory: A much "faster" exposition, meaning that it goes without too much fooling around on the point and derives the needed expressions in a couple of pages.

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