Linked Questions

34
votes
3answers
14k views

The exchange of photons gives rise to the electromagnetic force [duplicate]

Pardon me for my stubborn classical/semiclassical brain. But I bet I am not the only one finding such description confusing. If EM force is caused by the exchange of photons, does that mean only when ...
19
votes
2answers
6k views

Using photons to explain electrostatic force [duplicate]

I am trying to understand the idea of a force carrier with the following example. Let's say there are two charges $A$ and $B$ that are a fixed distance from each other. What is causing the force on $...
4
votes
1answer
6k views

Deriving Coulomb's law from quantum electrodynamics [duplicate]

Is it possible to derive the Coulomb's law using the principles of quantum electrodynamics? How?
5
votes
2answers
749 views

How can photons cause charges to attract? [duplicate]

Photons are the force carrier of the electromagnetic force. I do not see how this could result in a transfer of momentum that attracts objects together.
2
votes
2answers
259 views

Photon as a mediator of electric field [duplicate]

How can a photon (which has momentum) from one electrically charged particle to an oppositely charged particle cause these particles to be pulled toward each other - or how can a magnetic field cause ...
0
votes
1answer
149 views

Do positively charged particles exchange photons? [duplicate]

I learned in this video and in this answer that electrons repel from each other by exchanging photons. This makes sense when it comes to electrons, but what happens when two protons or two positrons ...
-2
votes
0answers
104 views

Why are virtual particles said to be non-real, non-existent? [duplicate]

Can we say that virtual (hypothetical, imaginary, belonging to fantasy) particles are observed when measuring a static force field? I.e., that their effect is observed? Which means that we indirectly ...
0
votes
1answer
46 views

Is the quantum analogue of electrostatic field photon? What will be its wavelength then? [duplicate]

When two charges are separated there is an electrostatic field between two. Quantum mechanically, is it actually the discrete energy packet or photons that's travelling from one charge to another? If ...
2
votes
0answers
45 views

Quantum mechanical photon exchange [duplicate]

Background: While trying to understand the Standard Model I stumbled on a paper that explained it in very simple terms. I recognized that I don't even understand the quantum mechanical way of the ...
0
votes
0answers
35 views

Quantum mechanical explanation of electrostatic force [duplicate]

Feynman diagram explains repulsion of electrons by means of photon exchange. Similarly can we explain repulsion of protons and attractions between protons and electrons?
1
vote
0answers
34 views

Force-carrying particles for electrostatic force [duplicate]

As I understand, Nuclear Fusion occurs when the nuclear forces overcome the electrostatic forces that act repulsively. But, what are these electrostatic forces? Are there force-carrying particles just ...
1
vote
0answers
18 views

Where does electrostatic interaction come from? [duplicate]

Naive view of particle physics The interactions come from fermionic particles exchanging bosons. Specifically, electromagnetic interactions result from charged particles exchanging photons. Question ...
24
votes
3answers
1k views

Can virtual particles be thought of as off-shell Fourier components of a field?

I just found this blog post, which gives an interpretation of virtual particles I haven't seen before. Consider a 1D system of springs and masses, where the springs are slightly nonlinear. A "real ...
7
votes
5answers
1k views

Why does an electron react differently to a virtual photon in the interaction between two electrons and between an electron and a positron?

For the interaction between, say an electron and a positron, there correspond many (infinite) Feynman diagrams with well described mathematical expressions for the incoming and outgoing particles and ...
10
votes
2answers
4k views

Is the force carrier of the magnetism in a common household magnet a photon?

As I have understood it, the Standard Model includes particles that carry the different forces, e.g. the electromagnetic (EM) force, the gravitational (G) force. When talking about EM fields such as ...

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