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If a projectile is thrown neglecting air resistance, then the horizontal distance covered by it in ascent and descent is same. if we consider air resistance, then i want to compare horizontal distance in ascent and descent. I am able to think of two approaches with contradicting results-

1. Average horizontal velocity is more in ascent so horizontal distance in ascent is more.

2. Time of descent is more so distance is more in descent.

I am confused which one is correct and why other is wrong? Any help is appreciated.

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1 Answer 1

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With air resistance, typically the horizontal distance is more on ascent, because it loses horizontal speed the whole way.

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  • $\begingroup$ I did a (rough) numeric simulation and found this to be true. $\endgroup$
    – R.W. Bird
    May 7 at 20:51
  • $\begingroup$ @R.W.Bird can you please post that here ? $\endgroup$ May 14 at 4:06
  • $\begingroup$ My simulation is on an Excel spreadsheet; several columns wide and a hundred or more lines long. Excel lets you set up a couple of lines of calculations, where the values on the second line are calculated from the numbers on the previous line. Then you can select the second line and drag it down (using a little dot in the lower right corner) to propagate the calculations downward (often as a function of time). You can also select a couple of columns as variables for plotting a graph. I would not know how to post a spreadsheet here (even if it were allowed). $\endgroup$
    – R.W. Bird
    May 14 at 14:23

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