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I'm just expressing my guess. Let two particles A and B experiences forces $F_1$ and -$F_2$ between them and let guess also there are two observer, one is stationary and other is moving with constant speed. Now my measurement time for the collision will not same for the moving observer.

So If I am stationary, the moving observer may say that my measurement is wrong that means Newtons third law is violated? Is it right?

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    $\begingroup$ Are you saying that the times of collision will be different? But why? Remember, in Newton's theory time is absolute. $\endgroup$ – Ana S. H. May 22 '13 at 16:44
  • $\begingroup$ Consider special relativity, your time and mine are not same. and this condition is when "two body attract from distant" $\endgroup$ – Physics_guy May 22 '13 at 16:49
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    $\begingroup$ Is your question about colliding particles, or is it about two objects attracting each other from a distance? $\endgroup$ – David Z May 22 '13 at 19:51
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So If I am stationary, the moving observer may say that my measurement is wrong that means Newtons third law is violated? Is it right?

No that isn't right.

Each observer is in an inertial reference frame and each observer will independently see that Newton's third law applies.

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Actually, third law won't apply solely to particles in Special Relativity because you need to include the field into conservation of total momentum.

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No, there is no violation. Both of the observers are in inertial reference frames, and Newton's Laws of Motion hold in inertial reference frames. The only problem would be with *non-inertial * reference frames, but there is no problem now. The difference in time would be possible, especially if the observer and object are travelling in opposite directions.

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