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How do we fix a charge (positive or negative) in a given position in electrostatics?

I know that we assume that we fix a charge by some unspecified force, but what are they? Please explain with some example.

Like what are the possible ways to do it with/without affecting other configurations of the charges in the surrounding

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    $\begingroup$ Are you effectively asking about Earnshaw's theorem? $\endgroup$ – Qmechanic May 25 '19 at 15:42
  • $\begingroup$ I don't know what is Earnshaw's theorem,my doubt is how do we fix a charge in a position in electrostatics $\endgroup$ – Sarath May 27 '19 at 4:54
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If by “fix a charge” you mean move a charge from one position to another, there are basically two ways.

A charge can move closer to or farther away from another charge of opposite polarity because of the attractive or repulsive force of the electric field that exists between them, respectively. In which case the energy to move the charge comes from the electric field.

Or the charge can be forced closer to or farther from another charge of the same polarity against the repulsive or attractive force of the electric field between them, respectively. In which case the energy comes from an external source. This is what happens when a battery charges a capacitor.

Hope this helps.

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You can attach a small metal sphere to an insulator such as a string. Charge up the sphere with some electrons and use the string to hang the sphere where you want it.

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