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How are different photon wavelengths explained with String Theory? From what I understand, a photon is a string with a particular configuration. Are all photon strings identical? There are photons in the IR spectrum with very long wavelengths, like the length of a city or even longer, but I don't know how particle wavelengths connect to strings in String Theory. Thanks.

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You can factorize the wavefunction of a single free string, into a wavefunction for the position of the center of mass, and a wavefunction for the excitations of the string relative to its center of mass. Wavelength of a single-particle wavefunction, corresponds to wavelength of the center-of-mass component of the string wavefunction.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks. Explains it nicely. I don't have the reputation score yet to upvote this comment, otherwise +1. $\endgroup$ – S. Beck Apr 12 at 2:54

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