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Is there anything along the lines of Polya's How to solve it? (mathematics) which can prepare one (Undergraduate/freshman students) for advanced level physics. More like give a glimpse into what sort of work one has to do in physics. Something related to problem solving as well.

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  • $\begingroup$ Do you mean "what sort of work one has to do in physics classes," or "what sort of work one has to do in a physics career"? Depending on your subfield of study, those questions can have very different answers. $\endgroup$ – probably_someone Sep 9 '18 at 15:47
  • $\begingroup$ @probably_someone not specifically with career. But something like a book on problem solving. Like there are different kind of problem solving books in Math, most known being Polya's, something along those lines. Which can prepare you for upcoming advanced classes. $\endgroup$ – Manny46 Sep 9 '18 at 15:54
  • $\begingroup$ Physics version of How to Prove It: A Structured Approach, 2nd Edition: Daniel J. Velleman ... amazon.com › How-Prove-S... , Something like this terrytao.wordpress.com/career-advice for physics $\endgroup$ – Manny46 Sep 9 '18 at 16:01
  • $\begingroup$ A solid foundation of calculus and for most advanced physics tensor mathematics and probability and statistics matters more than anything else. Lots of physics is just math warmed over. $\endgroup$ – ohwilleke Sep 9 '18 at 16:21
  • $\begingroup$ @ohwilleke yeah I'm working on math part. My question is specifically with Physics. Or do I just need to go through standard books? Isn't there any kind of physics problem solving books or some sort of reference you know of (related to advice for Physics students, more like what I've posted in above comment, terrytao blog and other books) $\endgroup$ – Manny46 Sep 9 '18 at 16:26
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I would suggest Leonard Susskind's "The Theoretical Minimum," which is both a lecture series and a book series. Based on the description, it might be what you're looking for, as it aims to teach the fundamentals of each field, at an advanced level, alongside the math that is needed to competently understand them.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks for the suggestion. Do you have anything related to problem solving (some article or book ) $\endgroup$ – Manny46 Sep 9 '18 at 17:23
  • $\begingroup$ @Manny46 Unfortunately, no reference specifically on problem-solving in physics immediately comes to mind. I suspect there are two reasons behind this: 1) most of the problem-solving in physics courses comes down to finding the best way to reduce a physics problem to a math problem; 2) the former type of intuition (the "reducing physics problems to math problems" part) is usually developed, in my experience, by looking at example problems, working through problems, and reading solutions to problems found in textbooks or courses. $\endgroup$ – probably_someone Sep 9 '18 at 17:29

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