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On studying the pictures representing the warping of space-time due to Black Holes, I realised the denser the black hole is the shorter its Event Horizon becomes, can we reach a point where we would increase the density to such a level that the Event Horizon would shorten into a point and hence a knot would form closing the Singularity of a Black Hole. Forgive me if this is dumb.

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  • $\begingroup$ I'm not quite sure what you mean by "the denser the black hole is the shorter its event horizon becomes." If you have a Schwarzschild (that is, no angular momentum or charge) black hole with mass $M$, then its event horizon is located at a distance $2GM/c^2$ from the center. That is, the event horizon grows with the mass. There are black hole solutions with naked singularities, which are interesting and possible what you're asking for, but they're hypothesized to not actually exist. Furthermore, what do you mean by "knot?" $\endgroup$ – Bob Knighton Jul 2 '17 at 18:40
  • $\begingroup$ actually I meant to say, that the more the density is the more it warps space-time and thus the circular boundary created due to the bent space-time (i.e. the boundary between normal and bent space-time) decreases in radius, and so if we keep increasing the density, the Schwarzschild radius would remain the same but the size of event horizon i.e. the Circular Boundary between the singularity and normal space-time will decrease in size $\endgroup$ – Ajinkya Naik Jul 3 '17 at 9:35
  • $\begingroup$ on increasing the density to such an extent that the size of the circular boundary would reduce into a point , thus it will close its way to the singularity. $\endgroup$ – Ajinkya Naik Jul 3 '17 at 9:35
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In classical general relativity, the Schwarzschild solution is always well-defined for any value of $M$, and by this, any value of the Schwarzschild radius. Hence there is no issue there, and the black hole simply becomes Minkowski space for $M = 0$.

For the Kerr black hole, the horizon will disappear before it is small enough to intersect with the ring singularity, leading to a naked singularity.

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  • $\begingroup$ I am sorry but this doesnt answer my question... $\endgroup$ – Ajinkya Naik Jul 2 '17 at 14:49
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The possibility has been and is being investigated. Such a black hole would rather be described as having a naked singularity. That is, a black hole without an event horizon (I'm not sure whether a non-zero, but smaller-than-singularity event horizon makes sense). It is regarded as unlikely though, as it brings along a few issues and paradoxical situations. So, the short answer is no. You can delete event horizon from time and space (not definitely but possible still unlikely) but not the singularity. Whatever you do, singularity will be exist. Like @Slereah said, it would be a naked singularity. But you can not close it.

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