Steve
  • Member for 4 years, 1 month
  • Last seen this week
How do towels stay on hooks?
Accepted answer
123 votes

There is some contribution from the friction of the various surfaces, but the main factor is the balancing of weight. It's important to note that the hook is set slightly away from the wall, which ...

View answer
Are colors grounded in physics or are they a matter of human perception?
29 votes

It depends on the sense in which you are using the word colour. In physics, the real phenomena which corresponds most closely to "colour" is electromagnetic frequency However, the eye itself does ...

View answer
Why are the wet patches on these floor tiles circular?
16 votes

Others have emphasised the effects of evaporation, but I'd suggest another key factor is likely to be related to several features of the grouting that make the edges dry sooner. Firstly, the fact ...

View answer
Does voltage depend on the surface area of a conductor?
14 votes

The analogy is good, but you appear to misunderstand it. Water pressure is not a function of the surface area of the piping, any more so than voltage is a function of the surface area of the wiring. ...

View answer
Why do I lose signal in a train but not in a car?
Accepted answer
9 votes

Could it be simply that there are a higher density of signals within a train carriage and fewer phone masts to service them at once? That is, you often have a dense crowd of people in a small space, ...

View answer
In concerts, why is the audience never heard as off-tune?
Accepted answer
6 votes

There are likely several effects in play. Firstly, most people have some awareness of their singing competence, and in the average population there are a fair number of reasonable singers (even if ...

View answer
Why doesn't the brain flip retinal image horizontally as well?
4 votes

The brain does flip the image horizontally, too, but talking of "flipping" in the first place gets a bit into pseudoscience, since the brain doesn't really do any "flipping" of images or have any a ...

View answer
Is Michelson-Morley experiment useless?
2 votes

The Michelson-Morley experiment wasn't designed to rule out aether. It was designed to establish it, according to the terms of how the aether was then conceived. What it showed instead was that the ...

View answer
If space is a vacuum, how can that happen without being encased inside something?
2 votes

It rather depends on how you conceive the situation. Space is indeed inside something - that thing being the "universe", which contains everything. And because the universe encompasses all things by ...

View answer
Do electrical appliances reduce the heating bill?
1 votes

Yes, using an iron is effectively free in a room that would otherwise be heated by the same electricity input. "Free" in the sense that the same heat input is being put to two purposes - ...

View answer
Is the "Radiation Paradox" a problem for a Cyclic Universe?
1 votes

In my view the main logical fault is assuming that we'd be able to count the number of cycles elapsed so far, or that a certain number of cycles ought to have been completed by now. A cyclic theory ...

View answer
According to the Standard Model is space (all particles removed including virtual particles/quantum fluctuations) nothing/void or is it something?
1 votes

In relativity, "particles" do not really form an essential part of the theory. Space is treated as a medium in which waves account for all the phenomena described by it. It may often be talked about ...

View answer
Is it possible to form modern physics using entirely "classical" theory?
1 votes

Remember that Einstein himself was willing to admit the Lorentz aether theory - once all its expected mechanical features had been eliminated! Relativity itself is still considered a "classical" ...

View answer
Constancy of speed of light in GR
1 votes

There is a difference between saying the speed of light is the same in any frame, and saying it is the same in all frames - because certain unexamined assumptions creep into the second statement, ...

View answer
Does a randomizer break the law of causality?
1 votes

Yes, real randomness is a concept that breaks causality. It is not agreed upon that any such thing exists. But note that it suffices for most human purpose that a process has obscure or inaccessible ...

View answer
Reverse entropy, reverse causality and physical laws
1 votes

How do you distinguish "reverse causality" from "ordinary causality"? That is, if you say X is the cause of Y, and Y (at some previous time) is the effect, how do you prevent me from simply ...

View answer
Photon energy depends on frequency (and/or amplitude)?
1 votes

The energy of light wave is not simply it's frequency component - it is both its frequency and amplitude. But as with any wave, amplitude is a different quality than frequency, and the two are not ...

View answer
Twin's clock slowing down
1 votes

@kpv, from the comments I'd say don't worry, there are plenty of smart people around here who can't make heads nor tails of what those who claim to understand relativity are saying. The admonition to ...

View answer
Does gravity have anything to do with Van Der Waals forces?
1 votes

An author called Zhang has indeed suggested they are related: https://arxiv.org/abs/1303.3579. As Zhang alludes to, "dark energy" is basically the new cosmological constant. And I have seen other ...

View answer
The domino effect
1 votes

Imagine the extreme cases. Dominoes placed zero distance apart (unspaced), and dominoes placed further apart than their length (over-spaced). It can be seen that when they are unspaced, the last ...

View answer
How to define white color scientifically?
1 votes

"Whiteness" is more of a biological and perceptual quality rather than something derivable from physical principles. It means the presence of light across all the humanly-visible range, or at least ...

View answer
During relativistic effects what would a person feel experiencing length contraction?
1 votes

If a "person" is a single entity with bodily integrity, then it follows that a person will never experience length contraction of any part of their own body, because the body parts do not move ...

View answer
Using faster than light signals to synchronize clocks
0 votes

Note that although a super-luminal method would establish an objectively preferred frame for light - and light would become subject to the same interpretation as sound (which exhibits all the same ...

View answer
If friction acts on car all time, why is it not accelerating forever?
0 votes

There are a number of reasons why the whole car does not simply accelerate indefinitely. If I've understood your question correctly, which is that having set the accelerator to a fixed position in a ...

View answer
Why do we experience a slice of time, but not a slice of space?
0 votes

I've been thinking about the nature of time in physics myself lately. I think really the reason why we experience only one slice of time at a time (so to speak) but all of space at once, is because ...

View answer
Science of Daisy-chaining
0 votes

Is it not more of a problem with unfused (or improperly fused) strips and adaptors? Or strips that are poorly designed with the assumption that the load presented at any one socket will be a certain ...

View answer
What does the accelerated twin see in the twin paradox?
0 votes

@TomB., I doubt the spacetime diagram will give you much insight - I never found them much help. There's basically three components to consider. The first is that, by virtue of being at a distance ...

View answer
Quantum mechanics interpretations
0 votes

There is not currently any experimental prediction that distinguishes the various interpretations. That is, they all predict the same thing, but employ different concepts to do so. They differ ...

View answer
Manometer physics? How to keep nozzles from draining?
0 votes

Add another valve onto one of the tees? Inject an air-gap into the lines (with an appropriate configuration of lines)? Once you have a continuous and unbroken line of liquid that is free to move, the ...

View answer
Why does light reflected from an LED TV screen make a sharp X pattern?
0 votes

I can't give a complete answer and I haven't been able to reproduce the exact effect on any TVs in my home (of varying ages between 1 and about 12 years old) using a plain light (not a laser pen). All ...

View answer