Auden Young
  • Member for 5 years, 7 months
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Can neutrinos interact by the EM interaction and gravity?
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A neutrino is thought to interact only through the weak force and gravity. They interact primarily, though, through the weak force (perhaps explaining the Martin/Shaw comment). Interestingly, since ...

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How the speed of light is constant with the particle horizon moving toward us?
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The problem with the assumptions in your second paragraph is that space is moving, not the galaxies. Space itself can travel faster than the speed of light - that is not forbidden by general ...

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Calculating Intensity/Strength of Vibration with 3DOF
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To formalize the comments (now in chat here): Associated jerk is probably what you want to calculate, as it is the measure of how violently something is shaken.$^1$ Jerk is the derivative of the ...

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why isn't all space expanding?
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The gravity of the galaxy$^1$ holds it together; that is what keeps the distance between stars in a galaxy expanding. In other words, the gravitational pull of the galaxy overcomes the antigravity "...

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Does string theory explain the existence of 3 generations of quarks/leptons?
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The official string theory website says this: Theoretical physics has not explained why there are three generations of particles that make up matter. Maybe string theory will come up with an answer ...

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Can molecules/atoms/any subatomic particle cause space time curvature?
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In a nutshell, yes. Think about Newton's gravity. Even you and I have some gravitational pull, even though it is tiny. The same is true for General Relativity. Even the tiniest of particles makes an ...

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General relativity applications other than gravity
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General relativity is a theory of gravity; as such, it makes predictions about gravity. However, general relativity does make predictions about time and physical entities such as black holes. Some of ...

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How do ink droplets passing through two charged metal plates become charged as well?
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An electron gun is used to shoot electrons at the ink which then gives the ink droplets a negative charge, varying based on where the ink needs to go. Then, the charged ink droplet passes between two ...

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Li-ion Battery charging
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What happens during the charging process is this: During charging, an external electrical power source (the charging circuit) applies an over-voltage (a higher voltage than the battery produces, ...

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Are contextual theories non-local and vice-versa?
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I believe the answers to your question can be found in Locality and realism in contextual theories by Dick Hoekzema. If I understand it correctly, the paper does show that contextual theories must be ...

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Constant velocity vs. acceleration
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The block would be accelerating (well, technically decelerating, but you get the idea). Why? It's slowing down, i.e., the velocity is changing, and acceleration is defined as change in velocity ...

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Calcuating Momentum
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The short answer: yes. Momentum (p) = mass $\times$ velocity, which can be written using the shorthand $$p=mv$$ and as $v$ and therefore $p$ are vectors, these are bolded: $$\mathbf{p} = m\mathbf{v}$$...

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Does Level IV Multiverse/Ultimate Multiverse contains 'impossible worlds'?
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The Level IV Multiverse is meant to contain all universes which can be described by different mathematical structures, according to Wikipedia. So it certainly contains universes that might have "...

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Photons at the big bang
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Well, photons were at the Big Bang, but it wasn't light that we can now observe until the era known as recombination, about 378,000 years after the Big Bang, that photons had a practically infinite ...

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Frequency of black holes
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Well, the Milky Way galaxy contains about 100 billion stars (which is a lower-end estimate). Around 1 out of every 1000 stars is of appropriate mass to form a black hole. So a very rough estimate is ...

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Time resulting of a thermodynamics effect?
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You are talking about the thermodynamic arrow of time; I'll talk about this in reference to entropy. It's actually not an uncommon idea, especially in cosmology. Let's think about a video of a teacup ...

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Change in Speed of Light
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Light as a Particle The photons in the beam of light are continuously being absorbed and re-emitted by the glass atoms (though this is also true in the other mediums light slows in). The level by ...

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Does the expanding universe prove the theory of relativity wrong?
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In a nutshell, no. General relativity says that objects with mass cannot travel faster than the speed of light. Space itself can travel faster than the speed of light because it doesn't have mass. ...

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Reference request: history of models and equations?
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One book I'd definitely recommend is John Gribbin's The Scientists. While it is a little more biographical, it does include the trial and error, the buildup, etc., as well as the stories of quite a ...

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Would it matter if baryon asymmetry was the opposite?
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Not really. If we were made of antimatter, we would think of matter as antimatter. Antimatter is really the same as matter, just with an opposite charge and opposite lepton/baryon numbers. The laws of ...

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Why don't solstices coincide with temperature extremes?
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The reason the hottest temperatures of the year are later than the solstice is because the land and oceans need time to warm up. Interestingly enough, there's a name for this phenomenon - "the lag of ...

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How does the ion mobility influence the elctrical fiels?
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In a word, yes. What you're doing is called sodium chloride electrolysis. A diagram of the experiment is shown below: Basically, because the salt has been heated until it melts, the sodium ions flow ...

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From Quantum Mechanics to Quantum field theory to String theory?
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As you said in your question, quantum field theory is very important; it takes the ideas of quantum mechanics and applies them to fields, such as the electromagnetic force (in fact, quantum ...

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About the non-locality of gravitational energy 2
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According to the abstract of a paper at https://arxiv.org/abs/hep-th/0604072, Breakdown of local physics in string theory at distances longer than the string scale is investigated. Such nonlocality ...

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