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I am actually a 7th grade student interesting of your level... but let us get to the fundamentals in quantum mechanics when we speak of wave-function you can interpret the Doppler effect which applies to sound and general particles if someone claims an electron behaves in a wave and as a particle you can infer that both of those are correct and ...


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Wave-particle duality only exists in quantum mechanics, not in acoustics. In the QM realm, that duality refers to the fact that very very very small objects can either manifest themselves as particles or as waves, depending on what type of measuring device you are using on them. So for a huge number of photons traveling through a prism, they act like waves, ...


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I am explaining my understanding: The wave particle effect is the momenta effect of a wave packet describing an energetic identity. So a photon is neither a wave nor a particle, it is not a wave sometimes and a particle some other times; it is a wave packet. Due to its momenta effect it may have some particle behavior, and as defining momentum in particles ...


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The “wave” of the electron is a probability wave used to describe quantum effects. For quantum-scale particles that have not had any effects measured (e.g. spin, momentum, position), the “particle” cannot be described as a discrete object in one spot/state, but as a wave existing in and moving through multiple states at once. This wave is described by the ...


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The concept of waves comes from observations and these observations were modeled mathematically with differential wave equations. The first waves observed , on the water , fitted well with the sine and cosine solutions of the wave equation, and energy and momentum moved over the water and the equations could predict the motion. Then it was discovered that ...


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Welcome to the physics stack exchange ABE. You have delved into the very deep and complex subject of "fields". Basically, fields are everywhere in space. It is a field that allows a radio wave to travel from earth to the moon and it is a field that allows a photon to travel as a wave from the sun to the earth. You have probably seen this photo ...


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The thing is that light is actually not consisting of particles, nor of waves. One should really think of light as consisting of "wave packages". It is sometimes best described as particles and sometimes as waves, but it is neither in general. Looking then at the photoelectric effect: If light was a wave, then electrons would come of the metal ...


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It is a crepuscular rays phenomenon. crepuscular rays, shafts of light which are seen just after the sun has set and which extend over the western sky radiating from the position of the sun below the horizon. They form only when the sun has set behind an irregularly shaped cloud or mountain which lets the rays of the sun pass through a cloud in bands. The ...


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It looks as though it may be a reflection off the curtain rod.


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Since the beams are going up to the ceiling, they must be reflecting from something low outside. Take a look.


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The rays are white, so it does not look like diffraction. Maybe it is an effect similar to that in camera obscura, so it is a (transformed) image of some outside object. EDIT (Jan 1, 2022): So the OP provided a photo of the outside objects and asked "why the horizontal white beams are not showing up on my ceiling". I am not sure about the following,...


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If only a single edge is needed to produce the wavelike intensity distribution on the screen, isn't this the most basic experiment from which to draw our conclusions? If one sees a wavelike intensity distribution on a screen, does this mean that the objects hitting the screen are waves? If the measuring instrument acts on the object with a force that ...


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You ask "am I way off base?" and I would say yes! .... but not the that far off. All particles, even baseballs, have wave properties in theory ... but for a large mass the the wavelength is so small it is impractical to measure, you would need a photon of such short wavelength that it could not exist. Per famous physicists Dirac and Feynman they ...


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maybe quantum particles are ALWAYS in the wave state except the brief moment of "interaction". It is misleading and not according to the mathematics of quantum mechanics to assign a wave nature to a single particle in space. The particles wave nature appears in the probabilily distributions of many particles under the same boundary conditions, and ...


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