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7 votes

Why can't thin clouds form rainbows?

Clouds are complicated. There are lots of different types of clouds, which may be composed of spherical or non-spherical water droplets, with uniform or non-uniform sizes; planar or columnar ice ...
rob's user avatar
  • 91.6k
5 votes

Why can't thin clouds form rainbows?

You only see a bright, first-order rainbow when you are looking toward rain or mist and the Sun is behind you. Also, You said, "Sunlight easily passes through thin layers of cloud." That ...
Solomon Slow's user avatar
  • 15.2k
5 votes
Accepted

Why doesn't ice in a glacier feel as cold when I touch it as the ice I get from my freezer?

TL;DR I tend to agree with the answer by @GyroGearloose that the difference in the temperatures of ice is the crucial factor here. In the glacier situation the the ice surface and the surface of one'...
Roger V.'s user avatar
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4 votes
Accepted

Why rain drops are spherical while water droplets on a glass surface are flat?

The answer is surface tension. When a droplet falls through the air, you only have one type of boundary that you need to account for (water-air $\sigma_{WA}$). In contrast, for a droplet on a flat ...
Adam's user avatar
  • 187
3 votes

Why doesn't ice in a glacier feel as cold when I touch it as the ice I get from my freezer?

Your modern freezer keeps a temperature of -18°C or below, intended to freeze any biological matter well below the temperature where biology as we know it is possible. A glacier only needs a ...
Gyro Gearloose's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Why won't there be any transfer of heat energy when ice at 0°C is in contact with water at 0°C in a closed container?

The other answers have hammered quite well that There is no such thing as heat inside a thing; heat is the name for the spontaneous transfer of energy due to temperature differences and so if it is ...
naturallyInconsistent's user avatar
3 votes

Why won't there be any transfer of heat energy when ice at 0°C is in contact with water at 0°C in a closed container?

As others have said, systems don't contain heat but contain internal energy. So, let's pretend your textbook used the correct term. To socratically answer your question -- why there is not heat ...
jwimberley's user avatar
  • 3,888
2 votes

Why won't there be any transfer of heat energy when ice at 0°C is in contact with water at 0°C in a closed container?

"If there is no transfer of heat between the two bodies placed in contact, they are said to be at the same temperature, but it doesn't mean that they have equal amount of heat in them." ...
Bob D's user avatar
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2 votes

Why won't there be any transfer of heat energy when ice at 0°C is in contact with water at 0°C in a closed container?

Heat transfer only occurs when there is a temperature difference.The heat flux 'q' s.t by$$\vec q =-\lambda \nabla T$$where $T$ is temperature and '$\lambda$' is coefficient, and if $T$ is same in ...
UnnamedUser's user avatar
1 vote

Why can't thin clouds form rainbows?

As hinted at in the last paragraph of @rob's answer, cloud droplets are simply too small to achieve the diffraction-limited angular resolution needed for the color bands to be distinguishable. ...
jkej's user avatar
  • 6,176
1 vote

Can siphons improve the efficiency of hydroelectric dams?

No, you cannot gain any efficiency. Remember the bernoulli equation: $P_1 + \frac12\rho v_1^2 + \rho gh_1 = P_2 + \frac12\rho v_2^2 + \rho gh_2$ If you have water at rest at $P_{atm}$ on the top, and ...
Pato Galmarini's user avatar
1 vote

Does Pipe Temperature Directly Correlate To Water Temperature?

It's engineering: it depends on your requirements. Wherever there is heat flow, there will be a temperature difference. How much is acceptable? Copper is pretty conductive of heat: if you put an ...
John Doty's user avatar
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1 vote

At what temperature does flowing water start to freeze?

The flowing does not change the freezing point of water, but it can change how difficult it is for the water to actually reach that temperature. If the air temperature is at, say, $–5 \rm °C$, the ...
RC_23's user avatar
  • 9,508
1 vote

Why doesn't ice in a glacier feel as cold when I touch it as the ice I get from my freezer?

Well, yes your hand is actually colder in Iceland than in your room. So $T_\text{hand}>T_\text{obj}$. But that does not justify why the sensation differs by that much, considering humans ...
Ritzthephysibeast's user avatar

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