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What Vasily Mitch says is true (+1). But some objects are colorful because of interactions that take place over a larger region than a single atom. Metals reflect light because electrons spread out through the metal. They can easily move, which makes them conductive. Classically, the oscillating electric field in light vibrates the electrons, and vibrating ...


12

It of course depends on what you define as colour. If it is defined as the change in the visible spectrum of a light, then a single atom can definitely absorb a photon of a preferable wavelength and thus sliglty change the spectrum of the passing light. Many atoms have excitation energies falling into the visible spectrum when atoms absorb the photons, they ...


4

Fact 1. One cannot hold a nuclear reactor. What it needs to work is tons and tons of material, mostly for protecting people from radioactivity Fact 2. Even if technology could come to the point of making a hand held reactor , only a robot could carry it. Unless a lot of material would surround it the human carrier would be dead. Fact 3. The radioactivity ...


4

It depends on the solid. Molecular solids derive their color, that is their optical reflection or transmission, from the molecules that they consist of. The molecules stick together by van der Waals forces, which have only little impact on their spectral properties. Some solids, like quartz (glass), diamond, ruby, derive their colors from impurities. You ...


4

I've grown curious about the phenomenon of light interference. In the context of what you have written your use of the word interference is inappropriate and might be better replaced with the word superposition? In Physics the common use of the word interference is when light from coherent light sources overlaps. For example, for a two slit arrangement with ...


3

A ray is a continuous beam from a source to a point of interception. It is a path followed by billions of photons, each of which is associated with a wave packet of finite size and measurable energy.


2

There is no evidence for "redness" in the sense of "perception or the sensation of red" outside humans (and some animals). There is plenty of evidence of photons with certain wavelengths that make us perceive red. The argument between Goethe and Newton is basically about "colour is subjective experience" and "colour is a ...


2

I am strongly of the idea that, as physicists, we should never forget that our theories are just that: theories. They are an attempt at a model which describes nature, but does not tell us exactly what nature is intrinsically. This model is as good as our measurements can be in the sense that an experimentally proven theory will be adequate as long as ...


1

As others have mentioned, physicists have studied higher dimensional theories to explain light and other phenomena, and it's certainly possible that some of these will eventually provide better explanations than the theories we have now. To address your first question about how "correct" our current theories are, they are very good; nearly every ...


1

So in that sense, what scientific evidence is there for the definable real world quality of redness independent our perception? The atomic spectra evidence, they have specific frequencies for specific colors perceived by our eyes. This is the electromagnetic spectrum as a function of the wavelength/frequency . Visible light is a very small part of the ...


1

The diagram is a bit misleading. The intensity variation due to diffraction at an edge is as follows, and what you might see on a screen even with a laser pointer and a razor blade edge. The extended lines are light which has been reflected off the edge imperfections.


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Color vision is based on the response of cone cells in the eye to different frequencies of light. For humans (with full color vision) there are three types of cones sensitive to different frequency ranges at different levels. Each individual photon in your superposed wave will be of a specific frequency, which for your question you've assumed is outside ...


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