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3 votes

How to be sure that when a muon passes a detector it is actually a muon?

You can tell by how its path curves in a magnetic field. That curvature is very explicitly governed by its charge-to-mass ratio, which for every known fundamental particle is pretty much unique. A ...
controlgroup's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

Why is isospin utilized in determining the branching fraction of $K_1(1270)\to K\pi\pi$ final states?

I assume you are trying to appreciate the coefficients 1/3 and 4/3 out of the isospin Clebsches $ | \langle j_1 \, m_1 \, j_2 \, m_2 | J \, M \rangle|^2$ for essentially the two separate decay ...
Cosmas Zachos's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Is the set of possible elementary particle types equal to the set of all combinations of their properties?

You seem to be asking whether the properties you've listed allows one to uniquely identify a particle. The answer is no, because: There are combinations of these properties that don't exists. For ...
Michael Seifert's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

Field redefinitions in the Higgs mechanism

It is ok to have field redefinitions that involve multiple fields. Ie, something like $A^i(x)\rightarrow f^j (A^i(x))$ (where $i,j=1, \cdots, N$ and $N$ is the number of fields) can be a valid field ...
Andrew's user avatar
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6 votes

Contribution of dark matter to running of physical constants

If dark matter is a new kind of particle or field, then yes, it should affect the running of Standard Model couplings. However, the amount may be exceedingly small. Since dark matter evidently couples ...
Andrew's user avatar
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0 votes

Why do we think there are only three generations of fundamental particles?

As an extra to the other answers, I want to point out that it is true that we have many reasons to believe that there are only three Weyl generations. These are generations for which we specify the ...
Gabriel Ybarra Marcaida's user avatar
1 vote

Can glueballs and bosons survive indefinetely in space (forming structures)?

Can <…> survive indefinitely in space (forming structures)? No, in a universe with positive cosmological constant. Whatever the mechanism is for formation of a composite object (that you called ...
A.V.S.'s user avatar
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