22 votes

Do we understand chemistry from particle physics?

While the discoveries of the rules of chemistry and some current practical wisdom is empirical, it is better to think of the entire nature of chemistry as dictated by the principles of quantum ...
Matt Hanson's user avatar
  • 3,092
11 votes

Do we understand chemistry from particle physics?

atoms have 8 electron "slots" in their outer shell The shape of the periodic table is one of the great successes of non-relativistic quantum mechanics. If we approximate that we're ...
rob's user avatar
  • 89.9k
6 votes

Do we understand chemistry from particle physics?

"Do we understand chemistry from particle physics?" I suggest that the answer is 'no', but some people believe on a theoretical basis that we should be able to understand chemistry from ...
terry-s's user avatar
  • 296
4 votes
Accepted

Different representations of the Yukawa interaction

Your second expression is meaningless. You need to saturate a row vector with a column vector, not to mention the spinor implicit index saturation, so it should be, instead, $$y_e \bar{e}_R H^\dagger ...
Cosmas Zachos's user avatar
4 votes

Do we understand chemistry from particle physics?

No. The problem with understanding chemistry from particle physics is the quantum solutions of anything more than Hâ‚‚ simply don't exist as analytic solutions. We can grind through particle physics on ...
Joshua's user avatar
  • 1,642
3 votes
Accepted

Custodial symmetry of the standard model symmetry group $SU(2)_L \times SU(2)_R$

I have included 5 links, including a "primary" one, which should help clear up the trail map for you; I think you've gone off it, but I can't be sure, as weird misconceptions have crept in. ...
Cosmas Zachos's user avatar
3 votes

Why don't we include diagrams with fermion and gauge boson external lines while calculating the effective potential of Standard model?

As a Lorentz-invariant Lagrangian does not necessarily imply a Lorentz invariant ground state of the theory, Lorentz invariance might, in principle, be spontaneously broken just as well as an ...
Hyperon's user avatar
  • 6,148
3 votes

Do we understand chemistry from particle physics?

We can build much of chemistry from non-relativistic quantum mechanics (NRQM). However, the "Standard Model" is relativistic quantum field theory (RQFT); and a direct derivation would ...
The_Sympathizer's user avatar
2 votes

Do we understand chemistry from particle physics?

As you can see from the wide range of answers, the answer to your question is rather philosophical, so even practicing chemists and physics do not necessarily agree on it. We believe that all chemical ...
tparker's user avatar
  • 47.5k
2 votes

Do we understand chemistry from particle physics?

Chemistry has a theoretical basis drawn from quantum mechanics, but relies on experimentation to confirm it's findings. Chemists reason about chemical properties (e.g. reactivity, oxidation states, ...
m_plus's user avatar
  • 21
1 vote

A confusion: Why are composite bosons possible?

This is a great question and something that confused me while studying superconductivity, where we often think of bound states of two electrons as a boson. I think the other answer and comments by ...
Nandagopal Manoj's user avatar
1 vote

A confusion: Why are composite bosons possible?

Consider a boson comprised of two fermions A and B. The boson has spin $0$. One way this can happen is one fermion is spin up and the other is spin down. Another way is A and B are mixtures of spin up ...
mmesser314's user avatar
  • 38.7k
1 vote

Why can't we insist that the strong interactions must preserve $CP$?

The answer is pretty simple. To make $$ \bar{\theta} = \theta + Arg det M = 0 $$ you have to chirally rotate the quarks so that $$ Arg det M = -\theta $$ The chiral rotation of quarks such as $$ \psi \...
MadMax's user avatar
  • 3,842
1 vote

What order did the particles of nature appear in?

You are assuming that the four fundamental forces existed separated for all the time to add up to the standard model, whereas the point is the opposite: they separated by coalescing (getting unified) ...
Wel Xavier's user avatar

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