18

The phrase "in principle" means that the action being described is hypothetical, usually assuming certain ideal conditions. It contrasts to an action performed "in practice", which refers to actually carrying out the task with all the real-world complications that arise. The use of "in principle" implies that the task may be ...


10

"In principle" things are things which can easily be derived from the fundamental principles of the model. This tends to get used in situations where the real life application of this is more complicated. As an example from my computer science background, if given a matrix problem $Y=MX$, it is, in principle, possible to solve for $X$ given $Y$ by ...


5

There is, in fact, physics in this. It's a easier to understand in terms of a camera (the same phenomena happens to video) because we can talk about a frame rate. The human eye has sort of an effective frame rate, but this is far less fixed and hence makes the analysis a little more complicated. For a video camera, a picture is taken every so many seconds. ...


5

If we were dealing with a video camera, then this would likely be due to the stroboscopic effect. It is also called "the wagon wheel effect", and it's related to the Nyquist-Shannon sampling theorem. The stroboscopic effect is a visual phenomenon caused by aliasing that occurs when continuous motion is represented by a series of short or ...


4

this is called the "stroboscopic effect" but it does not occur in your eye, it occurs because the light (LED or fluorescent) shining on the fan blades or fidget spinner actually blinks on and off at the mains AC frequency. Under sunlight or incandescent light, the stroboscopic effect will not occur, and the rotating element will appear to your eye ...


4

It's important to be aware that the phrase is by no means limited to physics, and it means the same thing there that it does in other contexts. It does not mean the same thing as "hypothetically". Instead, you use it when you have a simplified model for a situation, and the thing is possible in that model, even if it isn't possible in the more ...


3

It is my understanding that ultimately the realm of theories of physics is ill suited to axiomatization. There is an answer by stackexchange contributor knzhou about derivability in physics that I think happens to touch well on the axiomatization issue. In the wider realm of abstract thought the demarcation between mathematics and not-mathematics is that we ...


2

In principle is the opposite of in practice. That is something may be easy/possible in principle, but hard/impractical to do in practice. For example, finding roots of a 4-th degree polynomial is possible in principle, but is is rarely done in practice as the expressions are cumbersome and it is often easier to resort to numerical procedures.


2

To answer your question in one line....WE DON'T KNOW! So there are three main approaches for dark matter detection - Indirect detection, Direct detection, Collider Now each of these techniques have their merits and drawbacks. For example Indirect detection has a greater potential of detecting dark matter because of the abundance of dark matter in the ...


1

One of the fruits of an axiomatic theory is that some results that were not obvious at first, comes up from the axioms and definitions. The classical electromagnetism is a good example. The Maxwell equations + Lorentz force law can be regarded as axioms. The electromagnetic radiation was derived from them, and soon later confirmed by experience. Moreover, ...


1

At the time of writing, the US particle physics community is trying to address this and similar questions in a large community study. Dark matter being the elephant in the room that it is, it seems clear that we need all possible experiments and detectors and observatories we can get our hands on in order to make progress towards understanding the true ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible