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An atom is far more complex than 2 charged balls orbiting each other. For a start, you have to take into account quantum effects, which means simulating the wavefunction. One of the reasons that it was necessary to develop quantum theory is because the classical model of the atom being like an orbital system of classical particles would predict that ...


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In order to experimentally simulate an atom using charged balls you need a working classical model of an atom. It is certainly possible to put a negatively charged ball in orbit around a positively charged one, but this system will not behave as an atom. The system will loose energy as EM waves (because the charge accelerates) and you will not have ...


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Imagine we have a ball rotating around a pole due to a light string (sort of like a tetherball setup). We can calculate the angular momentum of the ball about the pole. If we imagine drag is minimal, then the ball spins quite freely. In this case, since the only force on the ball is from the string, and that force goes through the axis we are ...


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These are the fundamental definitions you must know and the rest follow from these. Let's say you are in reference frame $S$ with origin $O$. Assume that there's a particle of mass $m$ located at position $\vec{r}$ (called the position vector) with respect to $O$ and its velocity is $\vec{v}$. Then, $$\vec{L}_{\text{of the point particle with respect to a ...


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The rotation axis of a rigid body can be uniquely identified with a simple calculation once the rotation velocity vector $\boldsymbol{\omega}$ is known. The axis is defined by its direction and the point on the axis closest to the origin. The direction of the rotation axis is $$ \boldsymbol{\hat{z}} = \frac{ \boldsymbol{\omega}}{\| \boldsymbol{\omega} \|} \...


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