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Simplest possible thought experiment that illustrates the difference between the past and the future?

Another observation concerns Markov chains. If I make the process go backwards instead of forwards, the labels change. But this seems to be because we label the arrows with conditional probabilities. ...
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1 vote

Do irreversible thermodynamic processes CONSTITUTE time or do they MOVE IN time?

I think your question involves a bigger question such as: do phenomenons live in time or do they create it? I think the answer is strongly opinion-based so it may be hard to not infringe site's rules. ...
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4 votes
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Approximation of any reversible process by carnot cycle

Figure 7.1 answers the question but the $PV$ graph makes it hard to understand the answer. It easier to represent the process on the $TS$ graph because the Carnot cycle on this graph is rectangle. ...
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Entropy of a deterministic reversible system

I'm not sure what you mean by a "deterministic reversible system" (you didn’t answer my question) since reversible normally refers to a process or cycle, not a system. I'm also not sure what ...
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Entropy of a deterministic reversible system

You would need to have the actual equations of state that describe this gas to actually calculate the entropy change. If we assume it's an ideal gas, entropy depends only on internal energy and volume....
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1 vote

Why is rapid expansion/compression reversible?

The Otto cycle shown on the MIT website is a reversible idealization of the internal combustion cycle, not the actual cycle, which is an irreversible cycle since, among other things, the compression ...
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1 vote

Are Hamilton's equations reversible?

A dynamical equation system with dynamical variables $z$ is called reversible if it is invariant under the combination $(t\to -t, z\to I(z))$ where $I$ is an involution$^1$, cf. Ref. 1. Main example: ...
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-2 votes

Why must all reactions be reversible according to thermodynamics?

In thermodynamics equilibrium is understood where all the relaxation processes that are fast in the time scale of interest have already ended, whereas the slow processes are too slow to produce ...
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2 votes
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Why must all reactions be reversible according to thermodynamics?

Edit: To avoid confusion, the authors aren’t referring to thermodynamic reversibility (i.e., zero entropy generation). This never occurs in real life. They’re referring to whether a strongly ...
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2 votes

Why must all reactions be reversible according to thermodynamics?

Processes that are irreversible thermodynamically are reversible in detail, but (by definition) not in a bulk statistical sense. The underlying processes are reversible in the sense that if you had ...
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