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True weight is the product of mass and the local acceleration due to gravitation. Apparent weight is what an ideal spring scale measured. An extreme example of the difference between the two concepts is a person onboard the International Space Station. That person's apparent weight is nearly zero, as evidenced by the person's ability to weightlessly float ...


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In case you have access to the Journal of Applied Physics, this work is a comprehensive resource of III-V material parameters, including a brief discussion of the available references: I. Vurgaftman et al., J. Appl. Phys. 89(11), 5815 (2001) link to article $In_{0.52}Al_{0.48}As$ is discussed on page 5840 with a recommended value around $0.07 m_0$. Edit: I ...


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A recent book by François Gelis is in my opinion a fantastic book on QFT. The first half of the book is all the basics up to and including non-abelian gauge theory. While the second half introduces unrelated modern concepts in each chapter. For example it has a very nice review on the spinor helicity formalism, etc Lots of exercises and solutions at the end. ...


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Another good one is Mathematical Aspects of Quantum Field Theory, by de Faria and de Melo, published '10, ISBN-13: 9780521115773.


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Electricity and Magnetism for Mathematicians. A Guided Path from Maxwell's Equations to Yang–Mills is the only book I know that targets a mathematicial audience.


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The study of condensed matter systems using holography (AdS/CFT) is often referred to as AdS/CMT, holographic superconductors being one topic in this subfield. There is now a textbook called "Holographic Quantum Matter" by Hartnoll, Lucas, and Sachdev. The free arXiv preprint version is here. If you wanted to find very recent papers on this ...


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It's a longstanding hope that the planar limit of $\mathcal{N}=4,$ $SU(N)$ Super Yang-Mills theory on a four manifold can be computed from the topological string B-model on $\mathbb{CP}^{3|4}$ (with N topological D5 branes wrapping $\mathbb{CP}^{3|4}$). Nevertheless the precise identification is still conjectural. The hope was initiated by Witten in his ...


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Start by reading recent papers that the professor has published (if you do not have access to journals, I am sure she will be happy to send you copies of her latest papers). Even if you do not fully understand them, they will give you a basis to talk to her about her research. Then see if she has published any books and read those. Failing that, see if she ...


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Conselice (2014): "The evolution of Galaxy Structure over time". It's in Annual Reviews of Astronomy and Astrophysics. It's comprehensive and authoritative. Section 4 covers the evolution of morphology with redshift. I'm not sure what you mean by "increasingly structured". The fraction of spheroidal galaxies is higher now than at high ...


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Green's function formalism is a general quantum mechanical formalism, unlike the master equation approach, which relies on markovian assumption/regression of fluctuations/etc. There are many excellent textbooks on quantum field theory or quantum field theory in condensed matter physics, where the Green's function representation is derived based on the ...


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I found particularly useful chapter 10 of the Zaanen et al. book where several applications of the holographic superconductivity are discussed. However, this is a 2015 Ref. I am really interested in this topic and following the developments of your question.


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In my opinion, one of the best modern references is a book by Gattringer and Lang https://www.springer.com/gp/book/9783642018497. This book contains rather a broad introduction of the subject, from the elementary details, such as path integral on lattice and different discretizations. And then there is discussion on more modern aspects, such as a various ...


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In my opinion, one suitable book for beginners is the S. Chandrasekhar's books called Radiative Transfer (1960). Basic concepts and derivations are very well explained. Again, this is my opinion :).


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I'd recommend A Student's Guide to Vectors and Tensors. Very readable and suitable for a first year physics student. You can skip the tensors part if it doesn't interest you.


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This is a very good question!y Let me first try to address the issue of differential forms vs. tensors. First, as Qmechanic already mentioned, differential forms are special type of tensors. However, certainly not all tensors of importance to physics are differential forms. An example is that of vector fields, which are another kind of tensors. These appear ...


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