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You may refer Lim series books for problem solving approach and also you can use 1000 solved problems in classical physics, 1000 solved problems in Morden physics, A GUIDE TO PHYSICS PROBLEMS part 1and 2( Sidney B. Cahn Boris E. Nadgorny ) ,200 more puzzling problems in physics, and schaum series physics books.


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We have been developing and maintaining a python library to do symbolic calculations for General Relativity, among other things. Check out the "symbolic" module of EinsteinPy and also give a look at the various examples.


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When atoms and molecules interact with electromagnetic radiation, there could be some transitions between rotational, vibrational or electronic states. Whenever electronic transitions happens, the Coulomb interaction is changed due to the redistribution of the electrons. Hartree-Fock deals with the stationary states of many-electron systems, and do not ...


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An Introduction to Complex Systems is a recently published (2019) book by Tranquillo that has been very well reviewed in the Nov. 2019 Physics Today issue: The text provides a useful overview of complex systems, with enough detail to allow a reader unfamiliar with the topic to understand the basics. The book stands out for its comprehensiveness and ...


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I have found an interesting discussion about this question in the book (in french) "Mécanique quantique, Bases et applications" by Constantin Piron. He proves a Gleason-like theorem (A.2 Théorème fondamental, p.172) stating something like: if you would like to associate to each state (= vector) and proposition (= closed subspace of the Hilbert space) a real ...


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You might be better off starting with a book or books on computational physics. There are several free books in PDF format that covers computation physics and features many programs in python or another language. These books are fairly recent and covers many aspects of numerical calculations in addition to the physics of the problems. The options that I'm ...


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There is indeed a generalisation, although it requires some more advanced language. As @Artem Alexandrov mentioned this requires the use of differential forms. Note: Mathematicians should see the caveat at the end of post. I'll give the result first, because I think that's what OP wants to see, and then go on to explain the concepts used. The general ...


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Just filling in some gaps. Generations of practitioners have used these books, so they underlie what you read about in many of your textbooks. In order of quite subjective preference, Classical Groups for Physicists , by Brian G. Wybourne (1974) Wiley. Has the most usable Lie Group theory beyond monkey-see-monkey do SU(2) and SU(3). Is addressed to ...


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The triangle you mention is not a divergent integral, which is why it does not appear in the paper you mention. I wrote a Mathematica program Package-X to help solve integrals like this, and you can get a result for your integral by simply running this: << X` (*Load Package-X*) ScalarC0[p1^2, p2^2, p3^2, m, m, 0] // C0Expand The integral in which ...


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As is already mentioned in the comments, the Gauss coordinates would nowadays be known simply as "general curvilinear coordinates" or just "coordinates". To understand why Einstein introduces this concept at all requires understanding that for the longest time mathematics was not understood as the formal science constructed by the likes of David Hilbert at ...


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Edward A. Desloge Classical Mechanics, Vols I and II. Wiley-Interscience, 1982. The 93 chapters are remarkably short. This highly systematized and detailed book includes plenty of examples and several hundred problems, most with answers. From Newtonian mechanics it progresses to Lagrangians, Hamiltonians, and touches upon Relativity. Curiously, it is not as ...


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Anomalies is very popular and fast growing theme, so I will try collect main terminology and give major references. Anomalies with chiral fermions: David Tong: Lectures on Gauge Theory Jeffrey A. Harvey: TASI 2003 Lectures on Anomalies Adel Bilal: Lectures on Anomalies • An ABJ anomaly implies an explicit violation of the global symmetry. It is as bad ...


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You will not find tables of products of inertia because it is not necessary to know them. The moments of inertia for any rigid body about any axis can be calculated from the 3 principal moments of inertia, using a rotation of co-ordinate axes and application of the Parallel Axis Theorem. The principal moments of inertia are measured in the body co-ordinate ...


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You're missing two important details from the NIST website: i) there are three dots after the value, that is, not $8.314 462 618\,\mathrm{J/(mol\,K)}$ but $8.314 462 618...\,\mathrm{J/(mol\,K)}$; ii) the word "exact" in the uncertainty field. The molar gas constant $R$ is the product of the Avogadro constant $N_\mathrm{A} = 6.022\,140\,76\times 10^{23}\,\...


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As per the 2019 redefinition of the SI base units, the molar gas constant is exactly $8.314\,462\,618\,153\,24\,J\,kg^{-1}\,mol^{-1}$ The wikipedia number comes from the full multiplication of the Boltzmann constant, $k_B$, and the Avogadro constant, $N_A$, both numbers defined as having no uncertainty due to the aforementioned recent changes to the SI. I ...


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The use of conservation of momentum in the calculation which you quote does not make any sense to me. So I would not use it. A better idea which is closer to the description below is found in the unanswered question How does a ball cause a splash? (With the relevant math). The splash phenomenon is called a Worthington Jet. The object falling into water ...


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Therminology follows from vacuum expectation value of scalar fields in SUSY multiplet. In Coulomb phase gauge symmetry broken by vev: $SU(N) \to U^{N-1}(1)$. In suprconformal phase gauge group is not broken. For more details, I recomend you chapter 10.2 in Bertolini lectures Lectures on Supersymmetry. About N=4 you can consalt chapter 3.1 Supersymmetric ...


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Googling on the list of names in the footnote turned up the paper https://arxiv.org/pdf/1405.6755.pdf , which led to Deutsch and the other references below. Edward Farhi, Jeffrey Goldstone, and Sam Gutmann, "How Probability Arises in Quantum Mechanics," Annals of Physics, 192 (1989) 368, June 1989. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/...


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Xiao-Gang Wen's 'Quantum Field Theory of Many-Body Systems' is probably a good place to start. It will give you some 'big picture' information, but asking for something 'not too thorough' is likely to leave you with little. Xiao-Gang's book is excellent, but it will require that you step up to it. The advantage to that is that you'll need to step up to it ...


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