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I don't know what do you mean by "dummies". But in my opinion Introduction to Classical Mechanics(by David Morin) is a good book with a complete chapter dedicated to it. I would suggest you to give time to problems even if you find them hard or undoable. If not that, probably Resnick Haliday or University Physics are good for some introductory ...


3

I would recommend the following YouTube playlist by prof. Michel van Biezen: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mbMVOzP2SjM&ab_channel=MichelvanBiezen. It consists of ten rather short videos where step by step FBD's are done. I found this professor's channel to be quite useful, and if I ever needed more practice or clarification on a topic, I'd often check ...


2

I don't know of anything that feels comparable to the glory days of the old sci.physics.research USENET group. There is physicsforums.org, but it doesn't have the same feel. The pace of conversation is glacial. You're better off just going where-ever Baez & Schreiber are hanging out these days. But you've said you've sampled the physics blogs, and ...


1

While I’m not aware of any book covering all of “vector/tensor/operator and spinor geometric understanding” that’s suitable at an undergraduate level, I can offer a few recommendations regarding spinors mainly. Possibly the best, and specifically undergraduate-targeted introduction to spinors – available free online – is Andrew Steane’s pedagogical article, ...


1

After some further research I found this paper https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1029/2005RG000174 (Frey 2007), which outlines precipitation (electrons being freed from the magnetosphere and hence moving into Earth's upper atmosphere). I consider this satisfactory.


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The book "Gravitational Collapse and Spacetime Singularities" by Pankaj S. Joshi seems like a good place to look. The author begins with a chapter reviewing some differential geometry and general relativity, then dives into spherical collapse and cosmic censorship.


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No such resource exists, to my knowledge. Newton's presentation in the Principia was a work of brilliance, but as someone put it poetically "Newton's instrument was so difficult to use that only he could wield it with proficiency" (or words to that effect) My understanding is that all the results obtained in the Principia were later re-obtained ...


1

In case you are interested in a mathematical treatment (maybe the followig is not what you are looking for, but I guess my answer doesn't hurt): In modern treatments of classical mechanics, time is modeled as a 1-dim. euclidean space $E^1$. The two orientations of the translation space correspond to future- and past-pointing vectors. In addition, absolute ...


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