3

Most PhD theses are internal university publications, rather than journal publications (though in many cases the material contained in the dissertation is also submitted as one or more journal publications). So to find the thesis itself, you'll have to figure out how to navigate that university's library. When I finished my PhD a dozen years ago, I had the ...


1

Depends on what depth you need, and what exactly you mean by elastic physics. If you want something introductory that just deals with Hooke's Law and Simple Harmonic Motion in general, I'd probably recommend any Physics I textbook. Things like "An Introduction to Mechanics" by David Kleppner and Robert Kolenkow, or "Berkeley's Physics Course ...


1

I am relarively new in CEM. Here are two books that I have found useful: "Computational Methods for Electromagnetics", Peterson, Ray, Mittra, this covers a broad range of algorithms ranging from the Moment Method, Finite Elements and FDTD "The Finite Element Method in Electromagnetics", J. Jin, this is more geared towards Finite Element ...


1

John McGreevy has an excellent collection of lecture notes revolving around QFT. Much of the material is more advanced, but I'll highlight two items that might be suitable for your audience: Physics 239/139: Quantum information is physical (link to pdf) Physics 239a: Where do quantum field theories come from? (link to pdf) The first item addresses the ...


1

If you want to continue with some books which are of the level of Weinberg but do not use non-standard approaches then the following will be useful- Shankar, Ramamurti (2011). Principles of Quantum Mechanics (2nd ed.). Plenum Press. ISBN 978-0306447907. This book is fairly rigorous but still feels like a very intuitive pedagogical approach. It is written ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible