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At least to address the computational aspects of the turbulent, compressible flow solver parts, I will quote Kyle Kanos: On a more programmatical aspect, Toro's Riemann Solvers and Numerical Methods and LeVeque's Finite Volume Methods for Hyperbolic Problems are pretty much the bible for how to write code that will accurately model fluid flows. In both ...


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Don't let people tell you that you need to study 5 years of math to understand anything about general relativity. That's not true. I recently got a chance to teach a gen ed course at my college on special and general relativity, which was a lot of fun. Here is a reading list based on that course, which would probably be at a good level for you, or maybe ...


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For a down to earth but rigorous account distributions and delta functions (but not so much differential equations) you can beat James Lighthill's Introduction to Fourier analysis and generalised functions, Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0-521-05556-7. The book is quite thin, only 70 pages or so. It is written at the undergraduate level. Although ...


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There are many standard sources for this, the main one being the book of Sidney Coleman "The Uses of Instantons". A source which is very explicit and quite good, especially for the energy splitting, is "ABC of Instantons" by A I Vaĭnshteĭn, Valentin I Zakharov, Viktor A Novikov and Mikhail A Shifman. I highly recommend "ABC of Instantons". Recently a book ...


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Tesseract has already provided the fancy math, so I’ll avoid symbols entirely and talk about simple physics. In my opinion, dual spaces, covectors, and all the other mathematical concepts surrounding tensors can obscure the basic physics. A first exposure to tensors is usually by encountering the moment of inertia tensor when studying classical mechanics. ...


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1) Yes. The dual space to a tangent space $T_p$ (denoted $T^*_p$)can be defined as the set of all linear maps that take members of $T_p$ to $\mathbb{R}$, i.e. if we have $\omega\in T^*_p$, $V,W\in T_p$, and $a,b\in\mathbb{R}$ $$\omega(aV+bW)=a\omega(V)+b\omega(W)\in\mathbb{R}$$ In the same way, since $T_p$ is dual to $T^*_p$, we can say that vectors are ...


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You may want to check out the book by Matthews and Walker. This is the book I used for "mathematical methods" class. If I remember correctly, it's based on lectures by Feynman. It's very concise, although I don't know that it has enough "real world" examples to satisfy your taste.


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Just want to add a note to @Wolpertinger's answer regarding gauge aspects of the ultra-strong coupling regime. The perturbative QED's way of splitting the minimal coupling covariant derivative into free portion (free Dirac fermion) and interaction portion (fermion-photon vertex) is unfortunately distasteful, since the separate terms in isolation are NOT ...


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There are multiple layers to this: gauge transformations in electrodynamics in general and then in cavity QED specifically. For the general part, you will find useful information in almost any quantum optics textbook. ScullyZubairy has a treatment. For others see Book Recommendation: Quantum optics For cavity QED specifically, there is not much to add ...


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You are right in your thinking. When I was in school we did, and people still do, low energy neutron scattering off heavy (Pb, Os, and many other) nuclei. This was done in the neutron energy range of 2.0 - 8.0 Mev neutrons. The energy levels of the nucleus were found using the $(n,n'\gamma) reaction$. We also measured the nuclear scattering cross-sections as ...


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There is a free book online titled Computational Physics and the author is Konstantinos Anagnostopoulos. The book is available for download in PDF format. There are 2 versions of the book. One where the computer codes in the book are in Fortran and another copy for C++. I've only used the Fortran version but I assume the only differences are in the codes. ...


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Welcome :) If you know the wavelength of the laser you can estimate the power by using a photodiode and its responsivity for certain wavelengths. For optoelectronics you can read "Optoelectronics and Photonics" by S.O. Kasap. Also basic photodiode circuits are covered in this book. Beam divergence can be determined, assuming you are dealing with a Gaussian ...


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