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I'm not really sure if this can help you because I don't know about your background, but for a first approach to the topic I recommend Kinsler's "Fundamentals of Acoustics". It even has a chapter dedicated to reflection and transmision of waves, and although it mainly focuses on fluid media, it also have a section about solid walls.


2

Part II of my online book A. Neumaier and D. Westra, Classical and Quantum Mechanics via Lie algebras (2011 version) does precisely that. While it starts off with a chapter giving an axiomatic treatment of phenomenological thermodynamic, the next three chapters rederive all formulas (including the three laws of thermodynamics) in a rigorous way from quantum ...


2

A recent book by François Gelis is in my opinion a fantastic book on QFT. The first half of the book is all the basics up to and including non-abelian gauge theory. While the second half introduces unrelated modern concepts in each chapter. For example it has a very nice review on the spinor helicity formalism, etc Lots of exercises and solutions at the end. ...


2

Is this what you're looking for: H. Andréka, I. Németi, J. X. Madarász, G. Székely, "On Logical Analysis of Relativity Theories", arXiv:1105.0885?


2

I always feel that books like the Feynman lectures in Physics and Landau & Lifshitz are only really worth reading after you have an understanding of the subject. That is, you should already be able to do the maths a bit, so that you can better appreciate the physical interpretations. If you want a single volume but you have time in your hands (for a long ...


1

You will find tables of this sort of data within the materials science literature under key words wettability, spreading, capillary rise, contact angle, and surface energy. You will also find surface energy test fluid sets consisting of ranked series of specially-prepared chemical solutions with distinct and well-controlled surface energies. placing droplets ...


1

Personally, I cannot remember things I have no deep understanding of. And reading itself is no way to fix this. I need to think hard to connect all the ideas together, derive whole theory myself and ideally also do a lot of calculations which will manifest any superficiality in my understanding. No shortcuts, no magic books or videos, just a lot of hard work....


1

Gravitation, by Misner, Thorne and Wheeler considered as the authoritative textbook, covering all the basics in great detail and many significant historical breakthroughs in the research of GR. The only problem is that the book is very lengthy, due to the level of detail end explanations. P.S. If you wish just the " maths of GR in depth [but] without ...


1

We can detect the radio beam from pulsars (and even optical or X-rays from X-ray pulsars) but so far we have no observations about oscillation modes of neutron stars. We have no electromagnetic counterpart of such oscillations, apart from (but this is speculative) the so-called quasi-periodic oscillations observed in the soft-gamma after a magnetar burst (...


1

If you have a background of Computational Electrodynamics, then your first destination to refer are as follows: Numerical Techniques in Electromagnetics with MATLAB Hardcover by Matthew N.O. Sadiku Computational Electromagnetics with MATLAB, Fourth Edition Hardcover by Matthew N.O. Sadiku There are a few more specialised textbooks for Computational ...


1

You cannot go wrong with Jackson's Classical electrodynamics. It's a classic, and it contains a broad variety of topics, even very advanced ones. It's a pretty mathematically heavy book, so before tackling it you should have a good understanding of complex, as well as real analysis. You can see the table of contents here.


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I found this to a more in-depth mathematical look into the physics of waves: https://www.people.fas.harvard.edu/~hgeorgi/onenew.pdf It covers a lot of the topics covered in Ph 12a. Also, complex analysis is the analysis/calculus of complex-valued functions. It is slightly different than the study of complex numbers required for waves such as complex ...


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Berkeley Physics Course vol. 3 is all about waves: https://www.amazon.com/Waves-Berkeley-Physics-Course-Vol/dp/0070048606 I personally prefer the chapters reviewing waves in the book Optics, from E. Hecht: https://www.amazon.com/Optics-5th-Eugene-Hecht/dp/0133977226 Good luck with your studies! :)


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In case you have access to the Journal of Applied Physics, this work is a comprehensive resource of III-V material parameters, including a brief discussion of the available references: I. Vurgaftman et al., J. Appl. Phys. 89(11), 5815 (2001) link to article $In_{0.52}Al_{0.48}As$ is discussed on page 5840 with a recommended value around $0.07 m_0$. Edit: I ...


1

This is better suited for a comment, but I cannot post one. Have you found this resource? It appears to contain theoretical background, but I cannot judge if it is appropriate for your situation.


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Yes, it is by a German author who spends most of his time writing books which are pedagogic and student-friendly. He is Jacob. And he has written a book entitled "No-Nonsense Quantum Field Theory: A Student-Friendly Introduction" You could get it here in Amazon or Gumroad. He has written the textbook covering all basic and major aspects in a ...


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