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The image in the mirror is a virtual image. For a virtual image, the incoming light rays do not originate from a point from within the mirror as you can clearly see by drawing a ray diagram. However, imagine that you replace the mirror with a piece of glass and the 'image' in the mirror with real objects. Now the two set ups are different, but as far as the ...


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See, it's ironic, you giving us a two-dimensional image of what you are talking about, because for us of course all of those things are in the same plane, the plane of the screen that we are looking at it with. What is happening to you is that you are born into a set of biases which this science training that we get in physics is meant to try and suppress. ...


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The mirror creates a virtual image, which is a way of saying that the rays of light bounce off the object and off of the mirror in exactly the same paths they would if there was an actual object where the virtual image appears to be. Physically, they are indistinguishable. The brain completes this illusion because the physics of this virtual image is ...


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I think you are confused due to the terminology 'virtual' here. 'Virtual image' here does not mean there is no image, it simply implies that the image is not where it appears to be. If you are looking through a transparent material, you also see an image but this time, the object is actually at the place from where the light appears to come and hit your eyes....


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So comparing the image and object, they are perpendicular to each other. But our brain senses the image to be below object. Why? Because from your perspective, the light appears to be coming from point 2. But really this is a reflection. The light from point 2 is really coming from point 1.


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This gets a little long to explain the situation. See the bottom for answer to your questions. Many textbooks do a bad job explaining the theory of blackbody radiation. In particular, often they assume perfectly reflecting cavity without explaining why they do so. It seems to be often just copied from textbook to textbook. I don't know who and where ...


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You already understand how a string can sustain and propagate sinusoidal waves in both directions. Having a reflector at one end is a boundary condition, one that is compatible with the string's motions. Since the string allows propagation both ways the boundary condition representing the model of the reflecting wall constrains the ratio of the reflected and ...


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Its a bit weird to compare the phase of a wave and its reflection, since their directions are different. Both the sources you have put up are saying the same thing: Compressions are reflected as compressions, and rarefactions are reflected as rarefactions. Now because their directions are different, the phase difference is continuously changing, so I dont ...


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A camera doesn't "know" if a source image is real or virtual. As long as the rays from each point in the source image are not converging, and aren't diverging from a point too close to the camera lens, the camera can form a real image on the film or sensor array.


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Your colour effect is somewhat similar to what can be seen through the windows of some trains. A part of the blue sky is a source of polarised light. When viewing that part of the sky through a birefringent window and a linear polarisation analyser, it is possible to see the colour pattern. It is more likely (and cheaper) a window is birefringent due to a ...


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What is happening, in my opinion, is the result of two effects: First one is to notice that the glass of your window is most probably not uniform. Meaning, as a guess, it is thinner on the top and gradually gets thicker to the bottom, but in a very slight manner that only light feels it. What does this cause? Well if the glass also has two different ...


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