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Is the preferred basis problem solved?

This question is from 2013, so maybe this is too late as being a relevant answer, but I am going to write it anyway. The goal in this answer is to address how some proponents of the Everettian (many-...
Bulldozer's user avatar
4 votes

Do Bell’s inequalities assume determinism?

The original Bell inequalities (1964) assume something that later was called "determinism" (or outcome determinism) which means that $$P(AB,xy\lambda)\in\{0,1\}\tag{1}$$ where $P(AB,xy\...
Mauricio's user avatar
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1 vote

Do Bell’s inequalities assume determinism?

Bell inequalities assume that measurement devices are not correlated with the means by which measurements are chosen and that physical systems are described by stochastic variables: numbers picked out ...
alanf's user avatar
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9 votes

Do Bell’s inequalities assume determinism?

Maudlin is correct. In Bell’s original 1964 paper, he used a two-step argument. The first step (building off of the argument in the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) paper) got him to determinism, and ...
Ken Wharton's user avatar
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2 votes

Do Bell’s inequalities assume determinism?

Bell's inequality predicts a value for the correlations of entangled pairs must be greater than a certain value, if there are predetermined hidden variables encoded in the particles at the time of ...
KDP's user avatar
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-1 votes

Quantum Mechanical Limitations of Observation

Your question is about quantum mechanical limits on observation, so the issue is whether quantum theory places limits on whether you can measure a system without changing it. Quantum theory without ...
alanf's user avatar
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0 votes

Does QM recognise empty waves?

It is the EM field that you are interested in here ... not just any field. The EM field propagates many virtual fields even before the photon is created. Virtual fields are your "empty waves&...
PhysicsDave's user avatar
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0 votes

Does QM recognise empty waves?

In QM the wave function is the fundamental physical property describing your system. In your case, before you disturb the system by the measurement, it will be an extended object reaching threw the ...
Zaph's user avatar
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1 vote
Accepted

Does QM recognise empty waves?

In the MWI what is happening in reality is described by quantum equations of motion. In the pilot wave theory reality is described by the same equations of motion with point particles sprinkled on top....
alanf's user avatar
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0 votes

Does QM recognise empty waves?

I'm glad you called the photon a particle and that's the main thing you need to remember. There is no wave unless your talking about millions of individual coherent photons radiating from a common ...
Bill Alsept's user avatar
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2 votes
Accepted

Many-Worlds Interpretation: What Ensures Every Physically Possible Scenario is Actualized in Some Parallel Universe?

In the Many-Worlds Interpretation of the Mach-Zehnder Interferometer experiment, one interprets the universe as splitting into two, with photons traveling in different directions in each universe. ...
Nullius in Verba's user avatar
3 votes

Many-Worlds Interpretation: What Ensures Every Physically Possible Scenario is Actualized in Some Parallel Universe?

Saying the universe splits in two is a high level description of a messier process. Any measurable property of a quantum system is represented by an operator called an observable that describes how ...
alanf's user avatar
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1 vote

How do non-local correlations occur in QM without a cause?

Just to add to the already good answers: Entanglement is always created locally, at one point. From there the entangled particles can then propagate to different locations. So in that sense, there is ...
flippiefanus's user avatar
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1 vote

How do non-local correlations occur in QM without a cause?

A) Why can’t we simply be wrong in thinking that information can’t be propagated faster than the speed of light? Bacause in special relativity, faster-than-light in one reference frame is backwards-...
Nullius in Verba's user avatar
4 votes

How do non-local correlations occur in QM without a cause?

There are many ways to think of this type of phenomena. What we know is the following. You can draw your own conclusions from it. Theoretical fact. If we try to explain these correlations in terms of ...
Valter Moretti's user avatar
0 votes

Does Bohmian mechanics really solve the measurement problem?

You’ve asked a very good question, for the answer to it highlights weighty aspects of Bohmian Mechanics (BM). Your premise that we observe the wavefunction, ψ, is incorrect. In BM, the object system, ...
Tristan Laguz's user avatar
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Dictionary between interpretations of field operators

Perhaps there is a simple confusion. As you may notice yourself your points 1. and 2. are not compatible with each other. What you can say is that the quantization of a real scalar field is given by ...
lcv's user avatar
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-1 votes

Interpretation of nodes of infinite square well

The best theory of matter that we have is quantum field theory (QFT). The Schrodinger equation used in your example is just a simple approximation to QFT, it only describes "single-particle ...
Jos Bergervoet's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

Dictionary between interpretations of field operators

Assuming that you are interested in the physical interpretation of the hermitean field operator of a free relativistic scalar theory in the Heisenberg picture, its Fourier decomposition (omitting the ...
Hyperon's user avatar
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1 vote
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Relationship of the do-operator in do calculus and the notion of the collapse of wave a function

You make an interesting point, although not a popular one (at least not yet). Far more common is to interpret the wavefunction collapse as Bayesian updating (upon learning new information). See for ...
0 votes

Bell's theorem and fluid-mechanical experiments using droplets: are local hidden-variable theories possible after all?

This paper is wrong at the most basic level, without needing to go into the details that Rococo's answer does. Bell's assumptions were very general: his argument only needs the measurement outcomes to ...
benrg's user avatar
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0 votes

Bell's theorem and fluid-mechanical experiments using droplets: are local hidden-variable theories possible after all?

In 2022 they (K Papatryfonos, L Vervoort, A Nachbin, M Labousse, JWM Bush) made experiment claiming CHSH violation: https://arxiv.org/pdf/2208.08940 - using pair of droplets, each being able to choose ...
Jarek Duda's user avatar
0 votes

Does Bohmian mechanics really solve the measurement problem?

It's going to be weird answering a question so late, but i'm really looking for some feedback on a possible answer. I remember thinking about this exact issue while first reading Bohm's papers, and ...
Louis Etien's user avatar
10 votes

What happens to branching in the Many-Worlds Interpretation of quantum mechanics in the limit when Planck's constant goes to 0?

We learn from quantum mechanics courses that one recovers classical mechanics in the limit when Planck's constant goes to zero. This can be seen in the path integral formulation. This is why ...
alanf's user avatar
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