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Physics is not competant to provide an answer to this question, but we can approach it in a reasonable way and point to evidence one way or the other. The physics that we call 'fundamental' is, at the moment, general relativity and quantum field theory, and combinations thereof. The equation of motion in such theories is deterministic. It is difficult to ...


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There seems to be a confusion in this experiment, mixing frameworks and models. In the publication in the beginning of the description of the experiment they state: "First, we developed a superconducting artificial atom with the necessary V-shape level structure " . Super conductivity is a meta level , emergent from the underlying quantum mechanics, ...


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The simplest way to answer this question is to rephrase it in the Heisenberg Picture where states have no time-dependency. The two von Neumann axioms for quantum theory are only ever posed in the Schrödinger Picture: Evolution (quantum states evolve in time in accordance with the Schrödinger Equation) and Projection (each measurement of a physical value ...


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The pursuit of knowledge is the asking of many questions. The question you have asked here is a complex one, about which whole books have been written, but I will try to give you a brief answer. The quantum rules that govern the behavior of objects as small or smaller than individual atoms are quite different from the classical ones that govern the ...


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You think you are observing “classical physics” when you observe humans and planets, but what you are actually observing is the classical limit of quantum physics. Quantum physics applies to humans and planets as well as to electrons and atoms, but what we think of as quantum effects are not noticeable for large objects. There are no special rules for small ...


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Shouldn't they change their behavior -- say, their distribution -- when making a measurement on the other particle? The only way this effect would not be apparent when examining only one particle is if the distribution of outcomes (either up / down) is 50-50 for both particles (no matter the axis). Start with a generic normalized state $a UU+b UD+c DU+ d ...


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As far as I understand, the Bell test experiments show that observations (measurements) of entangled particles have an effect on one another. Not quite. The Bell test experiments show that measurements of entangled particles are correlated with one another in a way that is impossible using either classical mechanics or hidden-variable theories. Correlation ...


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The randomness of the outcome of repeated application of Born's Rule is an essential part of the Copenhagen Interpretation. If we find that, for instance, repeated measurements of a spin alternatingly along x and y axes produces a string of up-down results whose Kolmogorov complexity is substantially less than the length of the string, itself; i.e. an ...


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Asking "what is $\mathrm{Pr}(|{\Psi}\rangle=c_1|{1}\rangle+c_2|{2}\rangle$?" is not a well-defined question, because it does not correspond to a specific physical procedure. However, you can ask something like if I perform a projective measurement on the basis $|\phi_1\rangle = c_1|{1}\rangle+c_2|{2}\rangle$, $|\phi_2\rangle = c_2^*|{1}\rangle-c_1^*|{2}\...


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