Skip to main content
18 votes
Accepted

Does the cosmological constant entail a mass for the graviton?

No, you don't get a mass term in the propagator, and there is no graviton mass for GR with a cosmological constant. If you linearize about Minkowski space, $g_{\mu\nu}=\eta_{\mu\nu}+h_{\mu\nu}$, then ...
Andrew's user avatar
  • 51.1k
8 votes
Accepted

What Does Feynman Mean When He Says Amplitude and Probabilities?

I think the confusion starts from an interpretation of quantum mechanics I have seen many times applied to atomic orbitals or Young's double-slit experiment (YDSE). In the former case the electron has ...
JEB's user avatar
  • 35.4k
7 votes
Accepted

Is the size of a black hole singularity smaller than a fundamental particle?

The very short answer to this is: We have no idea. General relativity predicts that the singularity of a Schwarzschild black hole (which I assume is what you mean by "actual black hole") is ...
paulina's user avatar
  • 1,897
6 votes

Is the size of a black hole singularity smaller than a fundamental particle?

While @paulina's answer: we don't know is correct, because quantum gravity is not understood, I'll answer for a classical Schwarzschild blackhole as described by Kip Thorne. The size is zero, however ...
JEB's user avatar
  • 35.4k
5 votes

Is the size of a black hole singularity smaller than a fundamental particle?

We know that black hole is infinitely densed. More exactly: The theory of general relativity predicts that the center of a black hole is infinitely dense. This theory predicts very well everything ...
Thomas Fritsch's user avatar
3 votes

Can you calculate the radius of a hypothetical singular surface inside a black hole from observing changes to its linear momentum?

No, because as an observer outside the event horizon, you will never be able to see an object cross the event horizon. (See This post)
Lenard Kasselmann's user avatar
2 votes

What Does Feynman Mean When He Says Amplitude and Probabilities?

I believe your interpretation of Feynman is fully correct here. He is drawing a line between which objects in the theory need to have wavefunctions (amplitudes) and which can be described by ordinary ...
Dast's user avatar
  • 1,836
1 vote

Hawking Temperature of the BTZ Black Hole

Another option for finding the Hawking temperature of the BTZ black hole is by the formalism of the surface gravity $\kappa$ which connected to the Hawking temperature via: $$T_H=\frac{\kappa}{2\pi}$$ ...
Daniel Vainshtein's user avatar

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible