16 votes

How does pressure exist inside a drop of water?

The pressure outside a droplet arises from molecules bouncing against the droplet's surface, delivering an inward momentum "kick." Since the droplet doesn't shrink to nothing, there must be ...
Chemomechanics's user avatar
8 votes

How does pressure exist inside a drop of water?

The atmosphere and the surface tension forces both squeeze the water droplet which generates a pressure more than the atmospheric pressure inside the drop
Aarush Saharan's user avatar
8 votes

How does pressure exist inside a drop of water?

the reason is that the surface of the droplet acts as if it were a stretched rubber membrane which applies a squeezing force to the water inside. The stretched rubber effect is due to something called ...
niels nielsen's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Why is an adiabat steeper than an isotherm in a $p$-$V$ curve?

Why is an adiabatic steeper than an isotherm in a $p$-$V$ curve? The slope is steeper for the adiabatic process because there is no heat and all the work done in expansion is at the expense of ...
Bob D's user avatar
  • 70.3k
2 votes

How does pressure exist inside a drop of water?

The pressure exists inside a drop of water due to the cohesive forces between water molecules. These forces cause the molecules to be attracted to each other, creating tension within the drop. This ...
Rajib's user avatar
  • 1
2 votes
Accepted

Venturimeter - Doubt

Actually in a Venturi meter we usually make the approximation that height difference within the tube can be neglected. There are two reasons why this is valid: Venturi tubes are of small diameters (...
Aarush Saharan's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

Confusion regarding a wooden block floating in water in a sealed container

When the air pressure increases, the water pressure must increase as well to remain in equilibrium. It has to, otherwise there would be a net downward force on the layer of water at the surface. So ...
Michael Seifert's user avatar
2 votes

How big is light pressure as a fraction of light energy?

"I'm looking for a dimensionless expression/formula for the fraction of energy turned into kinetic energy ..." Here's a simple treatment... Suppose that the photon of frequency $f_1$ (and ...
Philip Wood's user avatar
  • 35.3k
2 votes
Accepted

Why does taking average pressure and multiplying with area given total hydrostatic force

If you plot pressure vs depth, you get a straight line of positive slope. The average value is the area under that line divided by the x-length of the line. The area under any sloped line is the area ...
RC_23's user avatar
  • 8,815
1 vote

Do negative pressures in Thermodynamics lead to a negative stress energy tensor?

For stable condensed matter, an enthalpic restoring force counteracts any mechanically induced shift in the intermolecular spacing away from the equilibrium spacing. Put more simply, the matter pushes ...
Chemomechanics's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

Idea behind partial derivative with respect to space multiplied by length

To understand this, you don't really need to know much about pressure, just calculus. The idea of a derivative is that it's a kind of "sensitivity" of one quantity to changes in another. ...
Kotlopou's user avatar
  • 284
1 vote

Confusion regarding a wooden block floating in water in a sealed container

I believe the degree to which the block floats above the water depends only on the density of the block relative to the density of the water. Increasing the air pressure above the water has little ...
Bob D's user avatar
  • 70.3k
1 vote
Accepted

Bernoulli's Equation - Doubt

You have basically the following image. We know the height at all the points, so we just need to know a velocity and pressure at some more points to determine the velocity at $C$. Where do we know the ...
AccidentalTaylorExpansion's user avatar
1 vote

How is entropy calculated in a Constant Temperature process, when a gas is compressed from from $p_1$ to $p_2$?

The formula involving volume for enetropy change at constant temperature, $$\Delta S=nR\ln\left(\frac{V_2}{V_1}\right)$$For an ideal gas at constant temperature, $$P1V_1=P_2V_2$$or $$\frac{V_2}{V_1}=\...
Chet Miller's user avatar
  • 33.3k

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