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Spontaneous symmetry breaking in phase transitions

Now suppose we are at high T. The spins now can have random directions in the ground state and they are not correlated among each other. But anyway I would say that even now if I do a rotation I could ...
MadMax's user avatar
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2d Ising model with a longitudinal field -- do the low and high temperature expansions converge for all nonzero $T$?

The following is a partial answer. I realized shortly after posting my question that there is a good reason to expect that the high temperature expansion will have finite radius of convergence in $T$ ...
user196574's user avatar
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3 votes

Why doesn't latent heat change the temperature?

Being historically correct, temperature is just what was measured via the length of a column of mercury because, we humans observed that the hotter the objects get, the greater the mercury rises; ...
Dheeraj Gujrathi's user avatar
2 votes

Why doesn't latent heat change the temperature?

Temperature is just the average kinetic energy, heat is basically movement of particles, so basically kinetic energy, so temperature is the measure of heat? Heat is not basically the movement of ...
Bob D's user avatar
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6 votes

Why doesn't latent heat change the temperature?

But heat energy is basically kinetic energy Thermal energy is not basically kinetic energy. Thermal energy includes molecular level translational and rotational modes, which are purely kinetic, but ...
Dale's user avatar
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Can latent heat exist when both phases cannot exist at same temperature?

I would answer this question with a quick introduction to thermodynamics. In short, thermodynamics is the science of the most probable outcome - no more, no less. Imagine a very zoomed in view on a ...
Jakob's user avatar
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How do I calculate predicted curves (or surfaces) on a substance's $p$-$T$ (or $p$-$V$-$T$) phase diagram?

Enthalpy (as a function of temperature and pressure), entropy (as a function of temperature and pressure) and surface energy (as a function of temperature and pressure) should be sufficient. This ...
Chemomechanics's user avatar
1 vote

How are states of matter determined experimentally?

There are a few things people typically measure in experiments to diagnose a phase of matter (or critical point / line separating two phases). Conventional phases of matter are diagnosed by the ...
just a phase's user avatar
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Gas and Vapour liquefaction

I think the statement is implying vapour as 'former' and gas as 'latter'. Am I correct here? Yes it would appear so, but additional context would be helpful. Also note- I don't have much clear ...
Bob D's user avatar
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2 votes

Gas and Vapour liquefaction

Like much JEE/NEET preparation material, the text states somewhat idiosyncratic definitions as universal fact and isn't quite right (and isn't proofread—see "liqufied"). I believe the ...
Chemomechanics's user avatar
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Does having a liquid (less dense than ice) above a floating (in water) ice cube, change the fact that the water level remains constant when ice melts?

Without the second liquid above, the ice displaces a volume of water exactly equal to its own weight. After it melts, the ice becomes the same weight and volume of water, which is why the water level ...
Vincent Thacker's user avatar

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