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[...] the only way to tell if they are EM neutral is if we tried to deflect them in a EM field, and they flew straight. But since even detecting them is hard, how can we tell whether they interact with an EM field, and get deflected or not? Our detectors detect electromagnetic interactions directly. You wouldn’t try to detect the neutrino twice; you’d just ...


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If neutrinos were charged, then beta decays (the problem whose solution required the proposal of the neutrino) wouldn't conserve electric charge. If neutrinos were charged, they would emit Cherenkov radiation in matter. They don't. (But particles which are scattered by neutrinos do. The IceCube detector in Antarctica detects neutrinos by looking at ...


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If neutrinos were charged, you could stop them with a thin sheet of aluminium or a few metres of air, like beta electrons with similar energies.


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Spins are angular momenta. Angular momentum is a vector, and conservation of angular momentum imposes the sign on the spin found. If in a reaction the electron goes off with a spin -1/2, the antineutrino-electron ( which conserves lepton number) has to have +1/2. The title though Why do antinutrinos have a spin of 1/2? is not concerned with the vector ...


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Ordinary matter tends to clump into things like galaxies, stars, and various detritus like dust, planets, orange peels and humans because it interacts with itself. It's pretty much been determined by the behavior of dark matter around galaxies that it doesn't interact with itself or with ordinary matter (or if it does, it does so to a vanishingly small ...


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The extraction process of the carrier isotope after each run was imperfect. Only about 95% of the isotope were extracted and the other 5% remained inside. Alternating between two different carrier gases allowed to distinguished between the isotope used in the current run and the remains of the other isotope still present from the previous run. See the ...


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